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How Do I Make My Forearms Bigger?

Reviewed on 3/5/2021

Making my forearms bigger

Your forearms are a part of the upper limb between the elbow and wrist.
Your forearms are a part of the upper limb between the elbow and wrist.

Your forearms are a part of the upper limb between the elbow and wrist. The forearm has two bones, namely, the radius (present toward the thumb or lateral side of the forearm) and ulna (present toward the little finger or medial side of the forearm). There are 20 forearm muscles that are divided into two compartments: the one in the front is called the anterior or flexor compartment, and the one behind is called the posterior or extensor compartment. You can build stronger and bigger forearms by workouts focused on building these muscles. Spot reduction or augmentation through diet or workouts is, however, a myth. Your muscles and bones do not exist in isolation. For stronger and bigger forearms, you need healthy arms and wrists as well. Thus, adequate nutrition and regular physical activity that strengthen your muscles can help you achieve a stronger body. Take the help of a qualified nutritionist to know the right amount of nutrients and calories you need to build muscles. Whenever you try a new workout, it is better to take the help of a professional trainer. This helps you get the best results and minimizes the risk of injuries.

Some of the workouts that can help you get the beastly forearms of your dreams are as follows:

Dumbbell wrist curl: To perform this workout, sit on the edge of a bench or chair holding a dumbbell (you may start with 1.5-2 lbs if you are a beginner) in your right hand. Place your right forearm on your right thigh so that the back of your right wrist is on top of your right knee. Lower your wrist without moving your forearm as far as it would go. Now curl your wrist to move the dumbbell toward your arm. Slowly lower the dumbbell back to the neutral position. Repeat 10-15 times on each side. Begin with two to three sets and increase up to three to four with practice.

  • Reverse dumbbell curl: For this exercise, you need to stand on the floor or an exercise mat with your feet slightly wide. Hold a dumbbell in each hand with your palms facing toward you. Keep your palms shoulder-width apart. Keep the upper arms aligned and do not move them throughout the exercise. Curl the weights up and bring them to your shoulder level engaging your biceps and forearms as you do so. Hold for a second and return to the starting position. Repeat 10-15 times for two to three sets.
  • Farmer’s walk: This is a simple workout. Grab a pair of dumbbells in your hands with a neutral grip. You can take heavier dumbbells for this workout according to your capacity. Keep your shoulders back and your abs tight. Simply start walking. Continue walking for 2 minutes with 30 seconds break in the middle.
  • Dumbbell wrist extension: To perform this exercise, sit on the edge of a bench or chair holding a dumbbell in your right hand. Rest your right forearm on your right thigh with the palm facing down. Place your right wrist on top of your right kneecap. Curl the dumbbell up as far as you can toward your biceps without moving your forearm or shoulder. Slowly bring the dumbbell back to the neutral position. Repeat 10-15 times on each side. Begin with two to three sets and increase up to three to four with practice.
  • Dumbbell hammer curls: Stand on the floor with your feet slightly apart. Hold dumbbells in each hand with your palms facing each other. Bend your elbows with your palms still facing each other. Do not move your arms. Keep your shoulder blades retracted throughout the exercise. Slowly return dumbbells to the original position. Repeat 10-15 times for two to three sets.
  • Crabwalk: Sit on the exercise mat facing upward. Bridge up with your hips so you are on all fours (reverse tabletop position). Keep your hands under your shoulders while the fingers point toward the feet. Walk back and forth on your hands and feet. Take 10 steps forward and 10 steps backward. Do two to three sets.

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References
https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/books/nbk536975/

https://blog.nasm.org/workout-plans/9-best-arm-exercises

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