How Do I(f) Current Inhibitors Work?

Reviewed on 6/22/2021

HOW DO I(F) CURRENT INHIBITORS WORK?

I(f) current inhibitors or I funny current inhibitors are drugs that lower heart rates and are used in the treatment of angina (a type of chest pain caused by reduced blood flow to the heart). I(f) current inhibitors work by selectively inhibiting I(f) ionic current channels which exhibit predominant expression in the sinoatrial (SA) node and are essential for regulating pacemaker activity in the SA node.

I(f) current channels are a mix of sodium and potassium inward current channels; they are activated on hyperpolarization to a diastolic range of voltages and modulated by the autonomic nervous system. The inward flow of positive ions through these channels results in the spontaneous diastolic depolarization phase, modulating the heart rate.

I(f) current inhibitors selectively block the HCN channel present within the SA node, inhibit I(f) currents, and lower the heart rate without affecting the contractility of the cardiac muscle.

HOW ARE I(F) CURRENT INHIBITORS USED?

In addition to high blood pressure, central alpha-2 agonists are used in conditions such as:

WHAT ARE SIDE EFFECTS OF I(F) CURRENT INHIBITORS?

Side effects associated with I(f) current inhibitors may include:

The information contained herein is not intended to cover all possible side effects, precautions, warnings, drug interactions, allergic reactions, or adverse effects. Check with your doctor or pharmacist to make sure these drugs do not cause any harm when you take them along with other medicines. Never stop taking your medication and never change your dose or frequency without consulting your doctor.

QUESTION

In the U.S., 1 in every 4 deaths is caused by heart disease. See Answer

WHAT ARE NAMES OF I(F) CURRENT INHIBITORS?

Generic and brand names of I(f) current inhibitors drugs include:

References
https://reference.medscape.com/drugs/if-current-inhibitors

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