How Do Nonionic/low Osmolality Contrast Media Work?

Reviewed on 10/29/2021

How Do Nonionic/low Osmolality Contrast Media Work?

Nonionic/low osmolality contrast media are mainly used as magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) contrast agents.

Nonionic/low osmolality contrast media, when administered orally, fill the stomach and intestines. These agents, when exposed to a strong magnetic field during an MRI, can increase the brightness of the organ to be visualized. As a result, the physician can easily differentiate between the bowel and other organs.

How Are Nonionic/low Osmolality Contrast Media Used?

Nonionic/low osmolality contrast media are MRI contrast agents used for identifying abnormalities in the:

What Are Side Effects of Nonionic/low Osmolality Contrast Media?

An injection of nonionic/low osmolality contrast media can cause the following side effects:

The information contained herein is not intended to cover all possible side effects, precautions, warnings, drug interactions, allergic reactions, or adverse effects. Check with your doctor or pharmacist to make sure these drugs do not cause any harm when you take them along with other medicines. Never stop taking your medication and never change your dose or frequency without consulting your doctor.

What Are Names of Nonionic/low Osmolality Contrast Media?

Generic and brand names of nonionic/low osmolality contrast media include:

  • Feridex
  • Ferumoxides
  • Ferumoxsil
  • Gadodiamide
  • GastroMark
  • Omniscan
  • Primovist

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References
https://reference.medscape.com/drugs/contrast-media-nonionic-low-osmolality

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