How Do Patent Ductus Arteriosus Agents Work?

Reviewed on 6/10/2021

WHAT ARE PATENT DUCTUS ARTERIOSUS AGENTS AND HOW DO THEY WORK?

Patent ductus arteriosus (PDA) agents are prostaglandin inhibitors used to treat PDA in the neonate and in premature infants. PDA is an opening between two blood vessels leading from the heart. Ductus arteriosus (communication between two major blood vessels of the heart, thoracic aorta [carries oxygenated blood], and pulmonary artery [carries deoxygenated blood]) is normal in fetal circulation and usually closes shortly after birth, and if it remains open (patent), it is called a PDA.

PDA agents work by blocking an enzyme cyclooxygenase that is essential for the synthesis of prostaglandins derived from the metabolism of arachidonic acid. Prostaglandins are responsible for maintaining the patency of the ductus arteriosus and the ductus closes when this prostaglandin effect is withdrawn.

Surgical ligation of PDA is performed when pharmacological closure fails, or PDA recurs.

HOW ARE PATENT DUCTUS ARTERIOSUS AGENTS USED?

Intravenous PDA agents are used for pharmacological closure of PDA in the neonate and in premature infants.

WHAT ARE SIDE EFFECTS OF PATENT DUCTUS ARTERIOSUS AGENTS?

The most common side effects of PDA agents include:

The information contained herein is not intended to cover all possible side effects, precautions, warnings, drug interactions, allergic reactions, or adverse effects. Check with your doctor or pharmacist to make sure these drugs do not cause any harm when you take them along with other medicines. Never stop taking your medication and never change your dose or frequency without consulting your doctor.

SLIDESHOW

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WHAT ARE DRUG NAMES OF PATENT DUCTUS ARTERIOSUS AGENTS?

Drug names include:

References
https://reference.medscape.com/drugs/patent-ductus-arteriosus-agents

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3232537/#:~:text=Additionally%2C%20there%20are%20serious%20concerns,necrotizing%20enterocolitis%20or%20gastrointestinal%20perforation

https://emedicine.medscape.com/article/891096-medication

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