How Do Salivary Stimulants Work?

Reviewed on 6/17/2021

HOW DO SALIVARY STIMULANTS WORK?

Salivary stimulants refer to a class of drugs used for treating dry mouth (xerostomia). Generally, the muscarinic receptors (M3) on the salivary gland are stimulated to produce saliva. The parasympathetic part of the nervous system releases neurotransmitter acetylcholine that acts upon the M3 receptors to stimulate saliva production. Salivary stimulants may either enhance the activity of the parasympathetic nervous system or directly bind to the M3 receptors to stimulate saliva production.

HOW ARE SALIVARY STIMULANTS USED?

Salivary stimulants are taken orally and used to treat xerostomia caused by:

WHAT ARE SIDE EFFECTS OF SALIVARY SUBSTITUTES?

Side effects of salivary stimulants include:

The information contained herein is not intended to cover all possible side effects, precautions, warnings, drug interactions, allergic reactions, or adverse effects. Check with your doctor or pharmacist to make sure these drugs do not cause any harm when you take them along with other medicines. Never stop taking your medication and never change your dose or frequency without consulting your doctor.

WHAT ARE NAMES OF SALIVARY STIMULANTS?

Generic and brand names of salivary stimulants include:

SLIDESHOW

Mouth Problems: TMJ, Canker Sores, Painful Gums and More See Slideshow
References
https://reference.medscape.com/drugs/salivary-stimulants

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4615242/

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