How Do Selective 5-HT3 Receptor Antagonists Work?

Reviewed on 6/22/2021

HOW DO SELECTIVE 5-HT3 RECEPTOR ANTAGONISTS WORK?

Selective 5-HT3 receptor antagonists are a class of medication that mainly aims to treat symptoms of irritable bowel syndrome (IBS).

5-HT3 receptors are mainly found in the brain and intestinal cells. When activated, they release a neurohormone called serotonin, which regulates:

People with IBS, who have diarrhea as a symptom, have increased serotonin levels found in their blood that can increase bowel reactions like cramps and diarrhea.

Selective 5-HT3 receptor antagonists prevent the binding of serotonin to 5-HT3 receptors in the intestine and help to:

  • Slow gut motility
  • Delay the passage of food through the colon and small intestine
  • Control bowel urgency
  • Improve bowel function
  • Relieve cramps associated with diarrhea

Thus, 5-HT3 receptor antagonist drugs are useful to treat diarrhea-predominant IBS.

HOW ARE SELECTIVE 5-HT3 RECEPTOR ANTAGONISTS USED?

  • Selective 5-HT3 receptor antagonists are mainly effective in treating diarrhea-predominant IBS in females.
  • Some 5-HT3 receptor antagonists are used to treat chemotherapy-induced nausea and vomiting.

WHAT ARE SIDE EFFECTS OF SELECTIVE 5-HT3 RECEPTOR ANTAGONISTS?

Selective 5-HT3 receptor antagonists, when taken orally, can cause some of these side effects:

The information contained herein is not intended to cover all possible side effects, precautions, warnings, drug interactions, allergic reactions, or adverse effects. Check with your doctor or pharmacist to make sure these drugs do not cause any harm when you take them along with other medicines. Never stop taking your medication and never change your dose or frequency without consulting your doctor.

WHAT ARE NAMES OF SELECTIVE 5-HT3 RECEPTOR ANTAGONISTS?

Generic and brand names of selective 5-HT3 receptor antagonists include:

QUESTION

What is irritable bowel syndrome or IBS? See Answer
References
https://reference.medscape.com/drugs/selective-5-ht3-receptor-antagonists

https://www.jbc.org/article/S0021-9258(20)62168-8/pdf

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