How Is Angioedema Treated?

Reviewed on 2/3/2021

What is angioedema?

Angioedema is treated by your doctor according to the cause of your angioedema, which includes medications and home care.
Angioedema is treated by your doctor according to the cause of your angioedema, which includes medications and home care.

When your body has a reaction to something you’ve come in contact with, you may have swelling beneath your dermis. A buildup of fluid beneath these deep layers of your skin typically occurs around the eyes, lips, genitals, hands, or feet. This type of swelling is called angioedema.

You may also experience urticaria, also known as hives. About 10% to 20% of people experience angioedema.

Symptoms of angioedema

Angioedema is swelling under the surface of your skin. This swelling may be painful. It typically occurs on your face, throat, hands, and feet. You may also experience swelling in your abdomen or other areas of your body. Your angioedema may also include hives.

Common symptoms accompanying the swelling include:

Causes of angioedema

There are four common causes of angioedema:

The most common cause of angioedema is an allergic reaction. You may be able to prevent this swelling by avoiding certain foods and environmental triggers.

Diagnosis for angioedema

Only a licensed healthcare professional can diagnose angioedema. Visit your doctor and inform them of your symptoms. To identify the specific cause of your angioedema, they may send you to an allergy and immunology specialist. This specialist will be able to determine your appropriate course of treatment.

Angioedema is typically a symptom of another medical condition. It can be difficult to determine the main cause of your swelling. There’s not a single test that can diagnose you. Your healthcare provider may need to do different checks and tests to get to the root of the problem. They will likely:

Treatments for angioedema

Once your doctor has determined the cause of your angioedema, they will be able to prescribe the correct form of treatment. Treatment plans vary. You may be treated for other causes that will reduce your swelling once they are addressed. Your doctor will treat you for allergic or non-allergic angioedema after they’ve diagnosed its cause.

There are methods that will reduce swelling and help provide fast relief from the pain. Seek immediate medical care if these treatments do not relieve your symptoms and your swelling worsens, or if you find that your airway is blocked.

Medications

If your angioedema is caused by an allergic reaction, an antihistamine may reduce your swelling. Anti-inflammatory medicines including corticosteroids may be prescribed if your symptoms have worsened.

A severe allergic reaction called anaphylaxis can accompany your angioedema. If this occurs you will need an epinephrine injection. If you know that you have a severe allergy, you should keep an epinephrine injector with you.

Allergic angioedema that lasts for long periods is classified as chronic. It may be treated with anti-inflammatory medications. These include medicines that target leukotrienes, which are thought to play a major role in allergic reactions.

Another medication that may be used to treat your angioedema is omalizumab. This protein mimics your body’s antibodies in order to reduce your sensitivity to allergens.

Hereditary angioedema cannot be treated by antihistamines and corticosteroids. To treat this rare form of angioedema, you’ll need to take medications that boost your acute-phase protein levels. These medications include danazol, tranexamic acid, and others.

Home care

The most common cases of angioedema are from acute allergic reactions. Changing your lifestyle to avoid the substances that cause your body’s reaction can help prevent future swelling and pain.

Complications and side effects of angioedema

Different medications may have different side effects. These depend on the cause of your angioedema and your doctor’s prescription. If you experience severe side effects while taking your medication, you should contact your doctor immediately to discuss potential complications from your medication.

If you are taking a medication to boost your acute-phase protein levels for hereditary angioedema, you could experience these side effects:

QUESTION

Allergies can best be described as: See Answer

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References
American Academy of Allergy, Asthma, & Immunology: "Hives (urticaria) and angioedema overview"

International Journal of Emergency Medicine: "Angioedema in the emergency department."

Mayo Clinic: "Hives and angioedema."

NHS Inform: "Angioedema."

National Health Service: "Diagnosis Angioedema."

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