Indocin vs. Colcrys

Are Indocin and Colcrys the Same Thing?

Indocin (indomethacin) and Indocin IV (indomethacin) for Injection and Colcrys (colchicine) are used to treat symptoms of gout.

Indocin is also used to treat severe rheumatoid arthritis, ankylosing spondylitis, osteoarthritis, acute gouty arthritis, bursitis, and tendinitis.

Colcrys is also used treat a genetic condition called Familial Mediterranean Fever in adults and children who are at least 4 years old. Colchicine was developed prior to federal regulations requiring FDA review of drug products; not all uses for colchicine are approved by the FDA. As of 2009, Colcrys is the only brand of colchicine approved by the FDA. Generic forms of colchicine have been used to treat or prevent attacks of gout, or to treat symptoms of Behçet's syndrome (swelling, redness, warmth, and pain).

Indocin and Colcrys belong to different drug classes. Indocin is a nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug (NSAID) and Colcrys is an alkaloid.

The brand name Indocin is no longer available in the U.S. but may be available as a generic.

Side effects of Indocin and Colcrys that are similar include vomiting or diarrhea.

Side effects of Indocin that are different from Colcrys include upset stomach, heartburn, a feeling of bowel fullness, constipation, bloating, gas, rectal irritation, dizziness, drowsiness, nervousness, headache, skin rash, itching, or blurred vision.

Side effects of Colcrys that are different from Indocin include nausea, cramping, or stomach or abdominal pain.

Both Indocin and Colcrys may interact with antidepressants or heart or blood pressure medications.

Indocin may also interact with alcohol, trazodone, vilazodone, cyclosporine, lithium, methotrexate, probenecid, blood thinners, diuretics (water pills), or steroids.

Colcrys may also interact with grapefruit and grapefruit juice, conivaptan, digoxin, diclofenac, imatinib, isoniazid, quinidine, antibiotics, antifungal medications, cholesterol-lowering medicines, HIV or AIDS medication, or medicines used to prevent organ transplant rejection.

What Are Possible Side Effects of Indocin?

Common side effects of Indocin include:

  • vomiting,
  • upset stomach,
  • heartburn,
  • diarrhea,
  • a feeling of bowel fullness,
  • constipation,
  • bloating,
  • gas,
  • rectal irritation,
  • dizziness,
  • drowsiness,
  • nervousness,
  • headache,
  • skin rash,
  • itching, or
  • blurred vision.

Tell your doctor if you experience unlikely but serious side effects of Indocin (indomethacin) and Indocin IV (indomethacin) for Injection including swelling of the hands or feet (edema), sudden or unexplained weight gain, hearing changes (such as ringing in the ears), mental/mood changes, difficult/painful swallowing, or unusual tiredness.

What Are Possible Side Effects of Colcrys?

Common side effects of Colcrys include:

  • diarrhea,
  • nausea,
  • cramping,
  • stomach or abdominal pain, and
  • vomiting.

What Is Indocin?

Indocin (indomethacin) and Indocin IV (indomethacin) for Injection is a nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug (NSAID) used to treat severe rheumatoid arthritis, ankylosing spondylitis, osteoarthritis, acute gouty arthritis, bursitis, and tendinitis. The brand name Indocin is no longer available in the U.S. but may be available as a generic termed indomethacin.

What Is Colcrys?

Colcrys (colchicine) is an alkaloid that is FDA-approved to treat gout in adults, and to treat a genetic condition called Familial Mediterranean Fever in adults and children who are at least 4 years old. Colchicine was developed prior to federal regulations requiring FDA review of drug products; not all uses for colchicine are approved by the FDA. As of 2009, Colcrys is the only brand of colchicine approved by the FDA. Generic forms of colchicine have been used to treat or prevent attacks of gout, or to treat symptoms of Behçet's syndrome (swelling, redness, warmth, and pain).

QUESTION

Gout is a form of arthritis. See Answer

What Drugs Interact With Indocin?

In late pregnancy, Indocin (indomethacin and other NSAIDs) should be avoided because it may cause premature closure of the ductus arteriosus. Serious side effects of Indocin may include heart attack, stroke, skin changes (paleness, blisters, rash, and hives), weight gain, swelling, shortness of breath, tachycardia, unusual bleeding (including GI bleeding), jaundice, stomach pain, and pain with urination, bloody urine, blurry vision, and back pain. Patients with asthma that are aspirin-sensitive should avoid use of this drug. Indocin may reduce the effectiveness of ACE inhibitors and increase lithium (Eskalith, Lithobid) levels; use with aspirin or similar agents is not recommended. Caution is advised as Indocin may react with a number of other drugs so the prescribing physician will need a list of current medications. Indocin should be used during pregnancy only if the potential benefit justifies the potential risk to the fetus and infant; it is not recommended for use in breastfeeding women.

What Drugs Interact With Colcrys?

Colcrys may interact with conivaptan, digoxin, diclofenac, imatinib, isoniazid, quinidine, antidepressants, antibiotics, antifungal medications, cholesterol-lowering medicines, heart or blood pressure medication, HIV or AIDS medication, or medicines used to prevent organ transplant rejection. Tell your doctor all medications and supplements you use. Tell your doctor if you are pregnant or plan to become pregnant before using Colcrys; it is unknown if it would affect a fetus. Colcrys passes into breast milk. Consult your doctor before breastfeeding.

How Should Indocin Be Taken?

Indocin is available in capsules in strengths of 25 and 50 mg, in suspension strength of 25 mg per 5 ml and as a suppository in strength of 50 mg per suppository. Initial doses usually start at 25 mg three times daily. Indocin IV (indomethacin) for Injection Sterile Vial contains 1 mg Indocin and is used by specialists in infants to close a patent ductus arteriosus in the heart and is not commonly prescribed. Indocin (indomethacin) ordinarily should not be prescribed for pediatric patients under 15 years old.

How Should Colcrys Be Taken?

The dosing regimens for Colcrys are different for each condition being treated, and must be individualized.

SLIDESHOW

Gout Attack Symptoms, Causes, Treatment, and Diet See Slideshow
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References
FDA. Indocin Product Information.
https://www.accessdata.fda.gov/drugsatfda_docs/label/2007/016059s097,017814s040,018332s030lbl.pdf
Takeda Pharmaceuticals. Colcrys Product Information.
https://www.colcrys.com/

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