How Do Iodinated Contrast Media Work?

Reviewed on 10/6/2021

HOW DO IODINATED CONTRAST MEDIA WORK?

Iodinated contrast media are contrast agents that contain iodine atoms used for X-ray-based imaging techniques such as computed tomography scans.

Iodine-based contrast agents can be water-soluble or water-insoluble compounds. As iodine has a high atomic number compared with most tissues in the body, the administration of iodinated material produces contrast images.

HOW ARE IODINATED CONTRAST MEDIA USED?

Iodinated contrast media are mainly used for:

  • Fluoroscopy (continuous X-ray image on a monitor)
  • Angiography (X-ray used for checking blood vessels)
  • Venography (X-ray used for checking veins)
  • Plain radiography (obtaining an image of internal structures by passing X-rays through them)

WHAT ARE SIDE EFFECTS OF IODINATED CONTRAST MEDIA?

An injection of iodinated contrast media can cause the following side effects:

The information contained herein is not intended to cover all possible side effects, precautions, warnings, drug interactions, allergic reactions, or adverse effects. Check with your doctor or pharmacist to make sure these drugs do not cause any harm when you take them along with other medicines. Never stop taking your medication and never change your dose or frequency without consulting your doctor.

WHAT ARE NAMES OF IODINATED CONTRAST MEDIA?

Generic and brand names of iodinated contrast media include:

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References
https://reference.medscape.com/drugs/iodinated-contrast-media

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