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Januvia vs. Janumet

Medical and Pharmacy Editor:

Are Januvia and Janumet the Same Thing?

Januvia (sitagliptin) and (sitagliptin/metformin) are oral diabetes medicines for people with type 2 diabetes (non-insulin-dependent) diabetes.

Januvia is sometimes used in combination with other diabetes medications, but is not for treating type 1 diabetes.

Side effects of Januvia and Janumet that are similar include runny or stuffy nose, sore throat, headache, back pain, joint or muscle pain, nausea, diarrhea, or constipation.

Side effects of Januvia that are different from Janumet include stomach pain.

Side effects of Janumet that are different from Januvia include vomiting, stomach upset, weakness, a metallic taste in the mouth, or sneezing.

Both Januvia and Janumet may interact with digoxin, probenecid, nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs), aspirin or other salicylates, sulfa drugs, monoamine oxidase inhibitors (MAOIs), or beta-blockers.

Januvia may also interact with other anti-diabetic medications.

Janumet may also interact with isoniazid, diuretics (water pills), steroids, phenothiazines, thyroid medicines, birth control pills and other hormones, seizure medicines, and diet pills, medicines to treat asthma, cold or allergy medicines, amiloride, triamterene, cimetidine, ranitidine, furosemide, morphine, nifedipine, procainamide, quinidine, trimethoprim, or vancomycin.

What Are Possible Side Effects of Januvia?

Common side effects of Januvia include:

  • runny or stuffy nose,
  • sore throat,
  • headache,
  • back pain,
  • joint or muscle pain,
  • nausea,
  • stomach pain,
  • diarrhea, or
  • constipation.

Although Januvia by itself usually does not cause low blood sugar (hypoglycemia), low blood sugar may occur if Januvia is prescribed with other anti-diabetic medications. Symptoms of low blood sugar include sudden sweating, shaking, fast heartbeat, hunger, blurred vision, dizziness, or tingling hands/feet.

What Are Possible Side Effects of Janumet?

Common side effects of Janumet include:

  • nausea,
  • vomiting,
  • stomach upset,
  • diarrhea,
  • constipation,
  • headache,
  • weakness,
  • back pain,
  • joint or muscle pain,
  • a metallic taste in the mouth, or
  • cold symptoms such as runny or stuffy nose, sneezing, and sore throat.

Janumet does not usually cause low blood sugar (hypoglycemia). Low blood sugar may occur if Janumet is prescribed with other anti-diabetic medications. Symptoms of low blood sugar include sudden sweating, shaking, fast heartbeat, hunger, blurred vision, dizziness, or tingling hands/feet.

What Is Januvia?

Januvia (sitagliptin) is an oral diabetes medicine for people with type 2 diabetes (non-insulin-dependent) diabetes. Januvia is sometimes used in combination with other diabetes medications, but is not for treating type 1 diabetes. Many people using Januvia do not have serious side effects.

What Is Janumet?

Janumet (sitagliptin/metformin HCl) is a combination of oral diabetes medicines for people with type 2 diabetes who do not use daily insulin injections. Janumet is not for treating type 1 diabetes.

What Drugs Interact With Januvia?

Januvia may interact with digoxin, probenecid, non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs), aspirin or other salicylates, sulfa drugs, monoamine oxidase inhibitors (MAOIs), or beta-blockers. Tell your doctor all prescription and over-the-counter medications you use. During pregnancy Januvia should be used only when prescribed. Pregnancy may cause or worsen diabetes. Your doctor may change your diabetes treatment during pregnancy. It is unknown if this drug passes into breast milk. Consult your doctor before breastfeeding.

What Drugs Interact With Janumet?

Hyperglycemia (high blood sugar) may result if you take Janumet with drugs that raise blood sugar, such as: isoniazid, diuretics (water pills), steroids, phenothiazines, thyroid medicine, birth control pills and other hormones, seizure medicines, and diet pills, or medicines to treat asthma, colds or allergies. Hypoglycemia (low blood sugar) may result if you take Janumet with drugs that lower blood sugar, such as: nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs), aspirin or other salicylates, sulfa drugs, monoamine oxidase inhibitors (MAOIs), beta-blockers, or probenecid. It may also interact with amiloride, triamterene, cimetidine, ranitidine, digoxin, furosemide, morphine, nifedipine, procainamide, quinidine, trimethoprim, or vancomycin. Tell your doctor all medications you use. During pregnancy, Janumet should be used only when prescribed. Your doctor may direct you to use insulin instead of this product during your pregnancy. Metformin can promote ovulation and increase the risk of becoming pregnant. Consult your doctor about use of birth control. Metformin passes into breast milk in small amounts. It is unknown if sitagliptin passes into breast milk. Consult your doctor before breastfeeding.

How Should Januvia Be Taken?

The recommended dose of Januvia is 100 mg once daily.

How Should Janumet Be Taken?

Dosage of Janumet is individualized. Janumet is given twice daily with meals in 50 mg sitagliptin/500 mg metformin hydrochloride or 50 mg sitagliptin/1000 mg metformin hydrochloride doses.

Reviewed on 3/13/2019

References:
Merck. Januvia Product Information.
https://www.januvia.com
Merck. Janumet Product Information.
https://www.merck.com/product/usa/pi_circulars/j/janumet/janumet_pi.pdf

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