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Keloid (cont.)

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In which area of the body are keloids most likely to appear?

Keloids develop most often on the chest, back, shoulders, and earlobes. They seldom develop on the face (with the exception of the jawline).

What is the difference between a keloid, hypertrophic scar, and a dermatofibroma?

After the skin is injured, the healing process usually leaves a flat scar. Sometimes the scar is hypertrophic, or thickened, but confined to the margin of the original wound. Hypertrophic scars tend to be redder and often regress spontaneously (a process which can take one year or more). Treatment, such as injections of cortisone (steroids), can speed this process.

A dermatofibroma is a small, benign, pigmented, very firm bump in the skin that does not cause other symptoms. It is most often found on the legs. Dermatofibromas are almost never larger than ½ to ¾ of an inch and remain unchanged over many years.

Keloids, by contrast, may start sometime after a cutaneous injury and extend beyond the wound site. This tendency to migrate into surrounding areas that weren't injured originally distinguishes keloids from hypertrophic scars. Keloids typically appear following surgery or injury, but they can also as a result of some minor inflammation, such as an acne pimple on the chest (even one that wasn't scratched or otherwise irritated). Other minor injuries that can trigger keloids are burns and cosmetic piercings.

A keloid has a characteristic microscopic appearance and may be distinguished from a hypertrophic scar and a dermatofibroma.

Medically Reviewed by a Doctor on 10/2/2017

Source: MedicineNet.com
https://www.medicinenet.com/keloid/article.htm

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