Kenalog-40 vs. Decadron

Are Kenalog-40 and Decadron the Same Thing?

Kenalog-40 (triamcinolone acetonide) and Decadron (dexamethasone) are corticosteroids used to treat allergic states, arthritis, skin diseases, blood disorders, renal diseases, respiratory diseases, and other disorders.

Decadron is also used to treat certain types of cancer and occasionally, cerebral edema.

Kenalog-40 is administered intramuscularly or intraarticularly, and Decadron is taken orally.

The brand name Decadron is no longer available in the U.S; it may be available as a generic.

Side effects of Kenalog-40 and Decadron that are similar include sleep problems (insomnia), headache, dizziness, nausea, appetite changes, stomach upset, acne, easy bruising, irregular menstrual periods, or weight gain.

Side effects of Kenalog-40 that are different from Decadron include allergic reactions, mood swings, euphoria, spinning sensation (vertigo), bloating, stomach or side pain, scaling or other skin changes, a wound that is slow to heal, thinning hair, swelling, sweating more than usual, and redness or pain at the injection site.

Side effects of Decadron that are different from Kenalog-40 include vomiting, skin rash, increased hair growth, anxiety, or depression.

Both Kenalog-40 and Decadron may interact with birth control pills or hormone replacement therapy, cyclosporine, antidiabetics, rifampin, seizure medications, antibiotics, aspirin or other nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs), or “live” vaccines.

Kenalog-40 may also interact with blood thinners, digoxin, insulin, and isoniazid.

Decadron may also interact with aminoglutethimide, potassium-depleting agents (e.g., amphotericin B, diuretics) anticholinesterases, oral anticoagulants, antitubercular drugs, cholestyramine, dexamethasone suppression tests (DST), digitalis glycosides, ephedrine, barbiturates, ketoconazole, thalidomide, and inactivated vaccines.

What Are Possible Side Effects of Kenalog-40?

Common side effects of Kenalog-40 include:

  • allergic reactions,
  • sleep problems (insomnia),
  • mood swings,
  • headache,
  • euphoria,
  • spinning sensation (vertigo),
  • dizziness,
  • nausea,
  • bloating,
  • appetite changes,
  • stomach or side pain,
  • stomach upset,
  • acne,
  • scaling or other skin changes,
  • a wound that is slow to heal,
  • thinning hair,
  • bruising or swelling,
  • sweating more than usual,
  • irregular menstrual periods,
  • redness or pain at the injection site, or
  • weight gain.

What Are Possible Side Effects of Decadron?

Common side effects of Decadron include:

  • nausea,
  • vomiting,
  • stomach upset,
  • headache,
  • dizziness,
  • acne,
  • skin rash,
  • increased hair growth,
  • irregular menstrual periods,
  • trouble sleeping,
  • increased appetite,
  • weight gain,
  • easy bruising,
  • anxiety, or
  • depression.

Side effects of Decadron (dexamethasone) listed above may become severe and include:

  • GI bleeding,
  • increased susceptibility to many types of infections, and
  • swelling.

What Is Kenalog-40?

Kenalog-40 (triamcinolone acetonide) is a corticosteroid indicated for intramuscular or intraarticular use only in allergic states, dermatologic diseases, endocrine disorders, gastrointestinal diseases, hematologic disorders, renal diseases, respiratory diseases, rheumatic disorders, and nervous system disorders where oral therapy is not feasible.

What Is Decadron?

Decadron (dexamethasone) is a corticosteroid, similar to a natural hormone produced by the adrenal glands, used to treat arthritis, skin, blood, kidney, eye, thyroid, intestinal disorders, severe allergies, and asthma. Decadron is also used to treat certain types of cancer and occasionally, cerebral edema. The brand name Decadron is no longer available in the U.S; it may be available as a generic.

QUESTION

The term arthritis refers to stiffness in the joints. See Answer

What Drugs Interact With Kenalog-40?

Kenalog-40 may interact with birth control pills or hormone replacement therapy, blood thinners, cyclosporine, digoxin, insulin or oral diabetes medications, isoniazid, rifampin, seizure medications, antibiotics, aspirin or other non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs), or “live” vaccines. Tell your doctor all medications and supplements you use and all vaccines you recently received. Systemically administered corticosteroids appear in human milk and could suppress growth, interfere with endogenous corticosteroid production, or cause other untoward effects. Caution should be exercised when corticosteroids are administered to a nursing woman. There are no adequate and well-controlled studies in pregnant women. Corticosteroids like Kenalog-40 should be used during pregnancy only if the potential benefit justifies the potential risk to the fetus. Infants born to mothers who have received corticosteroids during pregnancy should be carefully observed for signs of hypoadrenalism. Because of potential toxicity, Kenalog-40 use in pediatrics is cautioned.

What Drugs Interact With Decadron?

Decadron may interact with aminoglutethimide, potassium-depleting agents (e.g., amphotericin B, diuretics), macrolide antibiotics, anticholinesterases, oral anticoagulants, antidiabetics, antitubercular drugs, cholestyramine, cyclosporine, dexamethasone suppression tests (DST), digitalis glycosides, ephedrine, estrogens and oral contraceptives, barbiturates, phenytoin, carbamazepine, rifampin, ketoconazole, aspirin or other nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs), phenytoin, skin tests, thalidomide, and live or inactivated vaccines. Tell your doctor all medications and supplements you use and all vaccines you recently received. Decadron should be used during pregnancy or during breastfeeding only if the potential benefit justifies the potential risk to the fetus or infant. Infants may suffer adrenal suppression if their mothers use this drug during pregnancy. In special instances (for example, leukemia and nephrotic syndrome), Decadron has been used in pediatric patients. Such use should be done in most patients in conjunction with a pediatric specialist.

How Should Kenalog-40 Be Taken?

The usual suggested initial dose of Kenalog-40 is 60 mg, injected deeply into the gluteal muscle. Dosage is usually adjusted within the range of 40 mg to 80 mg, depending upon patient response and duration of relief. However, some patients may be well controlled on doses as low as 20 mg or less. Many doses are based on the patient's response to the medication and can be quite variable.

How Should Decadron Be Taken?

Decadron Tablets are available in 0.5, 0.75, 1, 1.5, 2, 4 and 6 mg strengths. The initial dosage for Decadron varies from .75 to 9 mg a day depending on the disease being treated. Infants born to mothers who have received substantial doses of corticosteroids during pregnancy should be carefully observed for signs of hypoadrenalism. Because of the potential for serious adverse reactions in nursing infants from corticosteroids, a decision should be made whether to discontinue nursing or to discontinue the drug, taking into account the importance of the drug to the mother. Use in pediatric patients is recommended to be done in consultation with a pediatric specialist.

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References
SOURCE:

Dailymed. Kenalog-40 Product Information

https://dailymed.nlm.nih.gov/dailymed/drugInfo.cfm?setid=cf970688-cd77-b95c-4bd9-c541590e9722

FDA. Decadron Product Information

https://www.accessdata.fda.gov/drugsatfda_docs/label/2004/11664slr062_decadron_lbl.pdf

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