Marsh Tea

Reviewed on 6/11/2021
Other Name(s):

James' Tea, Lède des Marais, Ledi Palustris Herba, Lédon des Marais, Ledum palustre, Ledum Silvestre, Marsh Citrus, Moth Herb, Petit Thé du Labrador, Rhododendron palustre, Rhododendron tomentosum var. tomentosum, Romarin Sauvage, Romero Silvestre, Sumpfporst, Swamp Tea, Te de Los Pantanos, Wild Rosemary.

Overview

Marsh tea is a plant. People use it to make medicine.

Marsh tea is used for muscle and joint pain (rheumatism), whooping cough, bronchitis, cold, cough, and chest and lung ailments. It is also used to stimulate milk flow, cause sweating, increase urine flow to relieve water retention, and loosen phlegm. Some women use marsh tea to cause an abortion.

How does it work?

Marsh tea might help decrease coughing and swelling. It might also affect the uterus.

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Uses & Effectiveness

Insufficient Evidence to Rate Effectiveness for...

  • Pain and swelling of the muscles and joints (rheumatism).
  • Whooping cough.
  • Bronchitis.
  • Colds.
  • Cough.
  • Fluid retention.
  • Stimulating milk flow.
  • Increasing sweating.
  • Causing an abortion.
  • Other conditions.
More evidence is needed to rate the effectiveness of marsh tea for these uses.

Natural Medicines Comprehensive Database rates effectiveness based on scientific evidence according to the following scale: Effective, Likely Effective, Possibly Effective, Possibly Ineffective, Likely Ineffective, and Insufficient Evidence to Rate (detailed description of each of the ratings).

Side Effects

Marsh tea is UNSAFE when taken in large amounts to try to cause abortion. It can cause severe irritation of the stomach and intestines, kidney damage, paralysis, and other serious side effects.

There isn't enough information to know whether it is safe to use marsh tea in smaller doses and for other uses.

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Special Precautions & Warnings

Pregnancy and breast-feeding: It's UNSAFE to use marsh tea if you are pregnant. It can stimulate the uterus and cause an abortion.

There isn't enough information to know whether it's safe to use marsh tea during breast-feeding. Stay on the safe side and avoid use.

Stomach or intestinal problems such as gastritis or inflammatory bowel disease: Marsh tea might make these conditions worse. Don't use it.

Kidney problems: Don't use marsh tea if you have kidney problems. It could make your condition worse.

Urinary tract problems such as kidney or bladder infections: Marsh tea might make these conditions worse. Avoid use.

Surgery: Marsh tea can slow down the central nervous system and cause sleepiness and other effects. There is some concern that marsh tea might slow down the central nervous system too much if it is combined with anesthesia and other medications during and after surgery. Stop using marsh tea at least 2 weeks before a scheduled surgery.

Interactions


Sedative medications (CNS depressants)Interaction Rating: Moderate Be cautious with this combination.Talk with your health provider.

Marsh tea might cause sleepiness and drowsiness. Medications that cause sleepiness are called sedatives. Taking marsh tea along with sedative medications might cause too much sleepiness.

Some sedative medications include clonazepam (Klonopin), lorazepam (Ativan), phenobarbital (Donnatal), zolpidem (Ambien), and others.

Dosing

The appropriate dose of marsh tea depends on several factors such as the user's age, health, and several other conditions. At this time there is not enough scientific information to determine an appropriate range of doses for marsh tea. Keep in mind that natural products are not always necessarily safe and dosages can be important. Be sure to follow relevant directions on product labels and consult your pharmacist or physician or other healthcare professional before using.

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You are encouraged to report negative side effects of prescription drugs to the FDA. Visit the FDA MedWatch website or call 1-800-FDA-1088.

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References

Blumenthal M, ed. The Complete German Commission E Monographs: Therapeutic Guide to Herbal Medicines. Trans. S. Klein. Boston, MA: American Botanical Council, 1998.

Brinker F. Herb Contraindications and Drug Interactions. 2nd ed. Sandy, OR: Eclectic Medical Publications, 1998.

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