How Do MET Tyrosine Kinase Inhibitors Work?

Reviewed on 10/25/2021

HOW DO MET TYROSINE KINASE INHIBITORS WORK?

Mesenchymal epithelial transition (MET) tyrosine kinase inhibitors are drugs used for treating lung cancer.

MET tyrosine kinase is a receptor present on the surface of various cells. These receptors have a ligand called hepatocyte growth factor (HGF). The binding of HGF to MET receptors leads to cell formation and wound healing in normal cells. However, mutations of MET can lead to the overactivity of cells, leading to tumor development.

MET tyrosine kinase inhibitors bind to MET and prevent the binding of HGF, thereby causing tumor cell death.

HOW ARE MET TYROSINE KINASE INHIBITORS USED?

MET tyrosine kinase inhibitors are used to treat nonsmall cell lung cancer in adults. Nonsmall cell lung cancer is a type of lung cancer that occurs in the lining of the surface of the lung airways.

WHAT ARE SIDE EFFECTS OF MET TYROSINE KINASE INHIBITORS?

Some of the side effects of MET tyrosine kinase inhibitors include:

The information contained herein is not intended to cover all possible side effects, precautions, warnings, drug interactions, allergic reactions, or adverse effects. Check with your doctor or pharmacist to make sure these drugs do not cause any harm when you take them along with other medicines. Never stop taking your medication and never change your dose or frequency without consulting your doctor.

WHAT ARE NAMES OF MET TYROSINE KINASE INHIBITORS?

Generic and brand names of MET tyrosine kinase inhibitors include:

SLIDESHOW

Lung Cancer: Early Signs, Symptoms, Stages See Slideshow
References
https://reference.medscape.com/drugs/met-tyrosine-kinase-inhibitors

https://www.cancer.gov/publications/dictionaries/cancer-drug/def/met-tyrosine-kinase-inhibitor-bms-777607

https://molecular-cancer.biomedcentral.com/articles/10.1186/s12943-018-0796-y

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