Mezereon

Reviewed on 6/11/2021
Other Name(s):

Bois Gentil, Bois Joli, Bois-Joli, Camolea, Daphne, Daphné, Daphné Mézéréon, Daphne mezereum, Daphné Mezereum, Daphné Morillon, Dwarf Bay, Faux Garou, Jolibois, Laureola Hembra, Leño Gentil, Mezereo, Mezereum, Morillon, Spurge Flax, Spurge Laurel, Spurge Olive, Wild Pepper.

Overview

Mezereon is a shrub. Historically, its bark was used to make medicine. But mezereon is seldom used medicinally these days due to serious safety concerns and because it is a protected plant species.

Mezereon is taken by mouth to relieve headache and toothache pain.

It is sometimes applied directly to joints to relieve pain and increase blood circulation.

How does it work?

Mezereon might stimulate the skin.

QUESTION

Next to red peppers, you can get the most vitamin C from ________________. See Answer

Uses & Effectiveness

Insufficient Evidence to Rate Effectiveness for...

  • Headaches.
  • Toothaches.
  • Joint pain, when applied to the skin.
  • Increasing circulation, when applied to the skin.
  • Other conditions.
More evidence is needed to rate the effectiveness of mezereon for these uses.

Natural Medicines Comprehensive Database rates effectiveness based on scientific evidence according to the following scale: Effective, Likely Effective, Possibly Effective, Possibly Ineffective, Likely Ineffective, and Insufficient Evidence to Rate (detailed description of each of the ratings).

Side Effects

Mezereon is UNSAFE when taken by mouth. It can cause many serious side effects including redness and swelling of the mouth, upset of the digestive tract, blood in the urine, hallucinations, increased heart rate, spasms, and death.

Mezereon might also be UNSAFE when applied directly to the skin. Skin contact with mezereon can cause red, painful swelling of the skin, blisters, and permanent skin damage (necrosis). Contact with the eyes can cause severe eye swelling and irritation.

SLIDESHOW

Vitamin D Deficiency: How Much Vitamin D Is Enough? See Slideshow

Special Precautions & Warnings

Pregnancy and breast-feeding: It is UNSAFE to take mezereon by mouth or apply it to your skin if you are pregnant or breast-feeding. Avoid use.

Dosing

The appropriate dose of mezereon depends on several factors such as the user's age, health, and several other conditions. At this time there is not enough scientific information to determine an appropriate range of doses for mezereon. Keep in mind that natural products are not always necessarily safe and dosages can be important. Be sure to follow relevant directions on product labels and consult your pharmacist or physician or other healthcare professional before using.

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Report Problems to the Food and Drug Administration

You are encouraged to report negative side effects of prescription drugs to the FDA. Visit the FDA MedWatch website or call 1-800-FDA-1088.

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References

Gruenwald J, Brendler T, Jaenicke C. PDR for Herbal Medicines. 1st ed. Montvale, NJ: Medical Economics Company, Inc., 1998.

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