Mirena vs. NuvaRing

Are Mirena and NuvaRing the Same Thing?

Mirena (levonorgestrel-releasing intrauterine device) and NuvaRing (etonogestrel and ethinyl estradiol vaginal ring) are forms of birth control used to prevent pregnancy.

Mirena is a hormone-releasing system placed in your uterus (intra-uterine device, or IUD) to prevent pregnancy for up to 5 years.

NuvaRing contains a combination of female hormones in a flexible contraceptive vaginal ring used to prevent pregnancy.

Side effects of Mirena and NuvaRing that are similar include headache, nausea, vomiting, bloating, changes in weight, breast pain/tenderness/swelling, nervousness, dizziness, changes in hair growth, changes in your menstrual periods, and decreased sex drive.

What Are Possible Side Effects of Mirena?

Side effects of Mirena include:

What Are Possible Side Effects of NuvaRing?

Common side effects of NuvaRing include:

  • vaginal infections and irritation,
  • vaginal itching or discharge,
  • headache,
  • nausea,
  • vomiting,
  • bloating,
  • stomach cramps,
  • changes in weight or appetite,
  • breast pain/tenderness/swelling,
  • headache,
  • nervousness,
  • dizziness,
  • tired feeling,
  • freckles or darkening of facial skin,
  • increased hair growth,
  • loss of scalp hair,
  • problems with contact lenses,
  • vaginal itching or discharge,
  • changes in your menstrual periods, and
  • decreased sex drive

SLIDESHOW

Choosing Your Birth Control Method See Slideshow

What is Mirena?

What is Mirena?

  • Mirena is a hormone-releasing system placed in your uterus by your healthcare provider to prevent pregnancy for up to 5 years.
  • Mirena can also lessen menstrual blood loss in women who have heavy menstrual flow and who also want to use a birth control method that is placed in the uterus to prevent pregnancy.
  • Mirena can be removed by your healthcare provider at any time.
  • Mirena is recommended for women who have had at least one child.

Mirena is a small flexible plastic T-shaped system that slowly releases a progestin hormone called levonorgestrel that is often used in birth control pills. Because Mirena releases levonorgestrel into your uterus, only small amounts of the hormone enter your blood. Mirena does not contain estrogen.

Two thin threads are attached to the stem of Mirena. The threads are the only part of Mirena you can feel when Mirena is in your uterus; however, unlike a tampon string, the threads do not extend outside your body.

What is NuvaRing?

What is NuvaRing?

NuvaRing (NEW-vah-ring) is a flexible birth control vaginal ring used to prevent pregnancy.

NuvaRing contains a combination of a progestin and estrogen, 2 kinds of female hormones. Birth control methods that contain both an estrogen and a progestin are called combination hormonal contraceptives (CHCs).

What Drugs Interact With Mirena?

Mirena may interact with insulin, blood thinners, or steroids

What Drugs Interact With NuvaRing?

NuvaRing may interact with bosentan, antibiotics, antifungal medications, drugs to treat hepatitis C or HIV/AIDS, phenobarbital and other barbiturates, St. John's wort, seizure medications, acetaminophen, ascorbic acid (vitamin C), atorvastatin, dantrolene, vaginal miconazole, tizanidine, or tranexamic acid.

QUESTION

Which of the following are methods for contraception? See Answer

How Should Mirena Be Taken?

Mirena contains 52 mg of levonorgestrel (LNG). Initially, LNG is released at a dose rate of approximately 20 mcg/day. This rate decreases progressively to half that value after 5 years. Mirena must be removed by the end of the fifth year and can be replaced at the time of removal with a new Mirena if continued contraceptive protection is desired. Drug interactions and warnings include potential interactions with insulin, warfarin (Coumadin) and steroids. Tell your doctor about all your prescription and over-the-counter medications, vitamins, minerals, herbal products, and drugs prescribed by other doctors. Mirena should not be used during pregnancy. This device can cause severe infection, miscarriage, premature birth, or death of the mother if it is left in place during pregnancy. Tell your doctor right away if you become pregnant while using the Mirena intrauterine system. Small amounts of progestins such as those in Mirena pass into breast milk. If you have recently had a baby and are breastfeeding, wait until your baby is at least 6 weeks old before you start using Mirena.

How Should NuvaRing Be Taken?

Nuvaring is inserted once a month for 3 weeks and then removed. A new ring is inserted after a 7 day break. NuvaRing may interact with bosentan, antibiotics, antifungal medications, drugs to treat hepatitis C or HIV/AIDS, phenobarbital and other barbiturates, St. John's wort, seizure medications, acetaminophen, ascorbic acid (vitamin C), atorvastatin, dantrolene, vaginal miconazole, tizanidine, or tranexamic acid. Tell your doctor all medications and supplements you use. Do not use NuvaRing if you are pregnant. NuvaRing can cause birth defects. Tell your doctor right away if you become pregnant, or if you miss two menstrual periods in a row. If you have recently had a baby, wait at least 4 weeks before using NuvaRing. The hormones in NuvaRing can pass into breast milk and may harm a nursing baby. NuvaRing may also slow breast milk production. Breastfeeding while using NuvaRing is not recommended.

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References
Medical Editor: John P. Cunha, DO, FACOEP

SOURCE:

RxList. Mirena Medication Guide.

https://www.rxlist.com/mirena-drug.htm#medguide

RxList. NuvaRing Side Effects Drug Center.

https://www.rxlist.com/nuvaring-side-effects-drug-center.htm

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