Mydayis vs. Dexedrine Spansule, Zenzedi

Are Mydayis and Dexedrine Spansule, Zenzedi the Same Thing?

Mydayis (mixed salts of a single-entity amphetamine product) and Dexedrine Spansule, Zenzedi (dextroamphetamine sulfate) are central nervous system (CNS) stimulants used to treat attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD).

Dexedrine Spansule, Zenzedi is also used to treat narcolepsy.

Side effects of Mydayis and Dexedrine Spansule, Zenzedi that are similar include insomnia, decreased appetite, weight loss, irritability, nausea, dry mouth, diarrhea, and erectile dysfunction.

Side effects of Mydayis that are different from Dexedrine Spansule, Zenzedi include increased heart rate, anxiety, feeling jittery, tooth grinding, depression, palpitations, and menstrual pain or cramping.

Side effects of Dexedrine Spansule, Zenzedi that are different from Mydayis include stomach upset, cramps, constipation, unpleasant taste in your mouth, headache, dizziness, nervousness, sweating, restlessness, loss of interest in sex, and difficulty having an orgasm.

Both Mydayis and Dexedrine Spansule, Zenzedi may interact with antidepressants and lithium.

Mydayis may also interact with acidifying or alkalinizing agents (GI and urinary), monoamine oxidase inhibitors (MAOIs), triptans, fentanyl, tramadol, tryptophan, buspirone, St. John's wort, quinidine, ritonavir, omeprazole, esomeprazole, pantoprazole, and cimetidine.

Dexedrine Spansule, Zenzedi may also interact with blood pressure medications, diuretics (water pills), antihistamines, acetazolamide, chlorpromazine, ethosuximide, guanethidine, haloperidol, methenamine, phenytoin, phenobarbital, and sodium bicarbonate (Alka-Seltzer).

Withdrawal symptoms may occur if you suddenly stop taking Mydayis.

What Are Possible Side Effects of Mydayis?

Common side effects of Mydayis include:

  • insomnia,
  • decreased appetite,
  • decreased weight,
  • irritability,
  • nausea,
  • dry mouth,
  • increased heart rate,
  • anxiety,
  • feeling jittery,
  • tooth grinding,
  • depression,
  • diarrhea,
  • palpitations,
  • menstrual pain or cramping, and
  • erectile dysfunciton.

Central nervous system stimulants, including Mydayis, have a high potential for abuse and dependence.

What Are Possible Side Effects of Dexedrine Spansule, Zenzedi?

Common side effects of Dexedrine Spansule, Zenzedi include:

  • nausea,
  • stomach upset,
  • cramps,
  • loss of appetite,
  • diarrhea,
  • constipation,
  • dry mouth or unpleasant taste in your mouth,
  • headache,
  • dizziness,
  • nervousness,
  • dizziness,
  • trouble sleeping (insomnia),
  • sweating,
  • weight loss,
  • irritability,
  • restlessness,
  • loss of interest in sex,
  • impotence, or
  • difficulty having an orgasm.

Tell your doctor if you have serious side effects of Dexedrine Spansule including:

  • numbness/pain/skin color change/sensitivity to temperature in the fingers or toes,
  • mental/mood/behavior changes (such as agitation, aggression, mood swings, depression, hallucinations, abnormal thoughts/behavior, thoughts of suicide),
  • uncontrolled movements,
  • muscle twitching or shaking,
  • outbursts of words or sounds,
  • swelling ankles or feet,
  • extreme tiredness,
  • significant unexplained weight loss, or
  • frequent or prolonged erections (in males).

QUESTION

The abbreviated term ADHD denotes the condition commonly known as: See Answer

What Is Mydayis?

Mydayis (mixed salts of a single-entity amphetamine product) extended-release capsules are a central nervous system (CNS) stimulant indicated for the treatment of Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD) in patients 13 years and older.

What Is Dexedrine Spansule, Zenzedi?

Dexedrine Spansule and Zenzedi are central nervous system stimulants used to treat narcolepsy and attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD).

What Drugs Interact With Mydayis?

Mydayis may interact with acidifying or alkalinizing agents (GI and urinary), monoamine oxidase inhibitors (MAOIs), selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs), serotonin norepinephrine reuptake inhibitors (SNRIs), triptans, antidepressants, fentanyl, lithium, tramadol, tryptophan, buspirone, St. John's wort, quinidine, ritonavir, omeprazole, esomeprazole, pantoprazole, and cimetidine. Tell your doctor all medications and supplements you use.

What Drugs Interact With Dexedrine Spansule, Zenzedi?

Dexedrine Spansule, Zenzedi may interact blood pressure medications, diuretics (water pills), antihistamines, acetazolamide, chlorpromazine, ethosuximide, guanethidine, haloperidol, lithium, methenamine, phenytoin, phenobarbital, sodium bicarbonate (Alka-Seltzer), or antidepressants. Tell your doctor all medications you are taking. Dexedrine should be used only if prescribed during pregnancy. Infants born to mothers who are dependent on this medication may be born too soon (premature) and have low birth weight. They may also have withdrawal symptoms. Tell your doctor if you notice mood changes, agitation, or unusual tiredness in your newborn. This medication passes into breast milk and may have undesirable effects on a nursing infant. Breastfeeding is not recommended. Dexedrine may be habit-forming. Withdrawal symptoms may occur after stopping this drug.

How Should Mydayis be Taken?

The recommended starting dose of Mydayis for adults and children 13 to 17 years is 12.5 mg.

How Should Dexedrine Spansule, Zenzedi be Taken?

The usual dose of Dexedrine Spansule, Zenzedi to treat narcolepsy is 5 to 60 mg per day in divided doses, depending on the patient response. For treatment of ADHD in pediatric patients 6 years of age and older, start with 5 mg once or twice daily; daily dosage may be raised by a physician.

SLIDESHOW

ADHD Symptoms in Children See Slideshow
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References
Takeda. Mydayis Product Information

https://www.mydayis.com/

Arbor Pharmaceuticals, LLC. Zenzedi Product Monograph.

http://zenzedi.com/

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