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Nayzilam vs. Potiga

Reviewed on 9/25/2019

Are Nayzilam and Potiga the Same Thing?

Nayzilam (midazolam) Nasal Spray and Potiga (ezogabine) are used to treat seizures.

Nayzilam is used for acute treatment of intermittent, stereotypic episodes of frequent seizure activity (i.e., seizure clusters, acute repetitive seizures) that are distinct from a patient's usual seizure pattern in patients with epilepsy 12 years of age and older.

Potiga is used as an add-on medication to treat seizures associated with epilepsy in adults.

Nayzilam and Potiga belong to different drug classes. Nayzilam is a benzodiazepine and Potiga is a neuronal potassium channel opener.

Side effects of Nayzilam and Potiga that are similar include drowsiness.

Side effects of Nayzilam that are different from Potiga include headache, nasal discomfort, throat irritation, and runny nose.

Side effects of Potiga that are different from Nayzilam include dizziness, fatigue, confusion, spinning sensation (vertigo), tremor, problems with coordination, double vision or blurred vision, problems paying attention, memory impairment, lack of strength, and skin discoloration. Serious side effects of Potiga include withdrawal seizures, QT interval changes, suicidal behavior and ideation, urinary retention, sleepiness, hallucinations, and confusion or behavioral changes.

Both Nayzilam and Potiga may interact with narcotics.

Nayzilam may also interact with other drugs that can make you sleepy (other benzodiazepines and sedatives/hypnotics, anxiolytics, tranquilizers, muscle relaxants, general anesthetics, antipsychotics, alcohol), ketoconazole, itraconazole, and clarithromycin.

Potiga may also interact with arsenic trioxide, digoxin, tacrolimus, antibiotics, antidepressants, anti-malaria medications, bladder or urinary medications, bronchodilators, heart rhythm medicines, irritable bowel medications, medicines to prevent or treat nausea and vomiting, medicines to treat psychiatric disorders, migraine headache medicines, and other seizure medications.

Withdrawal symptoms may occur if you suddenly stop taking Nayzilam.

What Are Possible Side Effects of Nayzilam?

Common side effects of Nayzilam include:

  • drowsiness,
  • headache,
  • nasal discomfort,
  • throat irritation, and
  • runny nose

What Are Possible Side Effects of Potiga?

Common side effects of Potiga include:

  • dizziness,
  • fatigue,
  • drowsiness,
  • confusion,
  • spinning sensation (vertigo),
  • tremor,
  • problems with coordination (ataxia),
  • double vision or blurred vision,
  • problems paying attention,
  • memory impairment,
  • lack of strength, and
  • skin discoloration

Serious side effects of Potiga include withdrawal seizures, QT interval changes, suicidal behavior and ideation, urinary retention, sleepiness, hallucination, and confusion or behavioral changes.

What Is Nayzilam?

Nayzilam (midazolam) is a benzodiazepine indicated for the acute treatment of intermittent, stereotypic episodes of frequent seizure activity (i.e., seizure clusters, acute repetitive seizures) that are distinct from a patient's usual seizure pattern in patients with epilepsy 12 years of age and older.

What Is Potiga?

Potiga (ezogabine) is a neuronal potassium channel opener indicated for use as an add-on medication to treat seizures associated with epilepsy in adults.

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What Drugs Interact With Nayzilam?

Nayzilam may interact with other drugs that can make you sleepy (other benzodiazepines and sedatives/hypnotics, anxiolytics, tranquilizers, muscle relaxants, general anesthetics, antipsychotics, opioids, alcohol), ketoconazole, itraconazole, and clarithromycin. Tell your doctor all medications and supplements you use.

What Drugs Interact With Potiga?

Potiga may interact with arsenic trioxide, digoxin, tacrolimus, antibiotics, antidepressants, anti-malaria medications, bladder or urinary medications, bronchodilators, heart rhythm medicines, irritable bowel medications, medicine to prevent or treat nausea and vomiting, medicines to treat psychiatric disorders, migraine headache medicines, narcotics, or other seizure medications. Tell your doctor all medications and supplements you use. Women should inform their doctors if they are pregnant or plan to become pregnant.

How Should Nayzilam Be Taken?

The initial dose of Nayzilam is one spray (5 mg dose) administered into one nostril. A second dose of one additional spray (5 mg dose) Nayzilam may be administered into the opposite nostril after 10 minutes if the patient has not responded to the initial dose.

How Should Potiga Be Taken?

Potiga is available in strengths of 50, 200, 300, and 400 mg film-coated immediate-release tablets. The initial dosage should be 100 mg 3 times daily (300 mg per day). The dosage should be increased gradually at weekly intervals by no more than 50 mg 3 times daily (increase in the daily dose of no more than 150 mg per day) up to a maintenance dosage of 200 to 400 mg 3 times daily (600 to 1,200 mg per day).

QUESTION

If you have had a seizure, it means you have epilepsy. See Answer

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References

FDA. Nayzilam Drug Information.

https://www.accessdata.fda.gov/drugsatfda_docs/label/2019/211321s000lbl.pdf

GSK. Potiga Drug Information.

https://www.gsksource.com/pharma/content/dam/GlaxoSmithKline/US/en/Prescribing_Information/Potiga/pdf/POTIGA-PI-MG.PDF

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