How Do Neurologic AntiCD20 Monoclonal Antibodies Work?

Reviewed on 1/12/2022

HOW DO ANTI-CD20 MONOCLONAL ANTIBODIES WORK?

Anti-CD20 monoclonal antibodies are scientifically produced antibodies used for treating symptoms of multiple sclerosis (potentially disabling disease of the brain and spinal cord).

B-cell lymphocytes are a type of white blood cells that are responsible for producing antibodies against invading pathogens. They have a CD20 cell protein on their surface that is targeted by most of the monoclonal antibodies. Recent studies have suggested that multiple sclerosis is caused due to the excess activity of CD20 cells. Thus, anti-CD20 monoclonal antibodies bind to the CD20 cells to destroy the B-cell lymphocytes.

HOW ARE ANTI-CD20 MONOCLONAL ANTIBODIES USED?

Anti-CD20 monoclonal antibodies are used for treating relapsing forms of multiple sclerosis.

WHAT ARE SIDE EFFECTS OF ANTI-CD20 MONOCLONAL ANTIBODIES?

Anti-CD20 monoclonal antibodies can cause the following side effects:

The information contained herein is not intended to cover all possible side effects, precautions, warnings, drug interactions, allergic reactions, or adverse effects. Check with your doctor or pharmacist to make sure these drugs do not cause any harm when you take them along with other medicines. Never stop taking your medication and never change your dose or frequency without consulting your doctor.

QUESTION

What kind of disease is multiple sclerosis? See Answer

WHAT ARE NAMES OF ANTI-CD20 MONOCLONAL ANTIBODIES?

Generic and brand names of anti-CD20 monoclonal antibodies include:

References
https://reference.medscape.com/drugs/neurologics-anti-cd20-monoclonal-antibodies

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