How Do Antisense Oligonucleotides Work?

Reviewed on 1/12/2022

HOW DO ANTISENSE OLIGONUCLEOTIDES WORK?

Antisense oligonucleotides are artificially created pieces of DNA used for the treatment of disorders involving gene mutation.

Generally, to produce a protein, a gene is first copied into a molecule called messenger RNA. The messenger RNA serves as a template for the cells to make the corresponding protein.

Antisense oligonucleotides bind to this messenger RNA and prevent its ability to make protein. In this way, the production of faulty protein is obstructed. In short, antisense oligonucleotides may be used to block the production of proteins needed for cell growth.

HOW ARE ANTISENSE OLIGONUCLEOTIDES USED?

Antisense oligonucleotides are used for the treatment of:

Antisense oligonucleotides are being studied in the treatment of several types of cancer.

WHAT ARE SIDE EFFECTS OF ANTISENSE OLIGONUCLEOTIDES?

Antisense oligonucleotides, when injected, can cause the following side effects:

The information contained herein is not intended to cover all possible side effects, precautions, warnings, drug interactions, allergic reactions, or adverse effects. Check with your doctor or pharmacist to make sure these drugs do not cause any harm when you take them along with other medicines. Never stop taking your medication and never change your dose or frequency without consulting your doctor.

WHAT ARE NAMES OF ANTISENSE OLIGONUCLEOTIDES?

Generic and brand names of antisense oligonucleotides include:

References
https://reference.medscape.com/drugs/neurologics-antisense-oligonucleotides

https://www.cancer.gov/publications/dictionaries/cancer-terms/def/antisense-oligonucleotide

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