Oxycodone vs. Tramadol

Are Oxycodone and Tramadol the Same Thing?

Oxycodone and tramadol are opioid pain relievers used to manage moderate to severe pain.

Brand names for oxycodone include Oxycontin, Roxicodone, and Xtampza ER.

Brand names for tramadol include Ultram and ConZip.

What Are Possible Side Effects of Oxycodone?

Common side effects of Oxycodone include:

Tell your doctor if you experience serious side effects of Oxycodone including

What Are Possible Side Effects of Tramadol?

Common side effects of Tramadol include:

  • agitation,
  • nervousness,
  • anxiety,
  • seizures (convulsions),
  • skin rash,
  • dizziness,
  • spinning sensation,
  • hallucinations,
  • fever,
  • fast heart rate,
  • overactive reflexes,
  • nausea,
  • vomiting,
  • upset stomach,
  • diarrhea,
  • constipation,
  • loss of coordination,
  • headache,
  • drowsiness, and
  • fainting.

What is Oxycodone?

Oxycontin (oxycodone hydrochloride) is an opioid drug used for the management of moderate to severe pain, usually for an extended time period. Oxycontin is not an "as needed for pain (PRN) drug." Oxycontin is available as a generic drug.

What is Tramadol?

Tramadol is a pain reliever (analgesic) used to treat moderate to moderately severe pain in adults.

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What Drugs Interact With Oxycodone?

Oxycodone may interact with alcohol, other narcotic pain medications, sedatives, tranquilizers, sleeping pills, muscle relaxers, other medicines that can make you sleepy or slow your breathing, monoamine oxidase inhibitors (MAOIs), antidepressants, methscopolamine, scopolamine, bladder or urinary medications, or irritable bowel medications.

Oxycodone may also interact with mixed agonist/antagonist analgesics, macrolide antibiotics, azole-antifungals, protease inhibitors, rifampin, and cardiovascular drugs (including amiodarone and quinidine).

What Drugs Interact With Tramadol?

Tramadol may interact with alcohol, other narcotic pain medications, sedatives, tranquilizers, sleeping pills, muscle relaxers, other medicines that can make you sleepy or slow your breathing, antidepressants, and MAO inhibitors.

How Should Oxycodone Be Taken?

Oxycodone hydrochloride is available as controlled-release tablets in strengths of 10, 15, 20, 30, 40, 60, 80, and 160 mg tablets (60 mg and above used only for opioid tolerant patients). The tablets must be swallowed whole because broken or chewed tablets release the drug too rapidly and because Oxycodone is rapidly adsorbed, too concentrated levels will be present in the body which can lead to death. Oxycodone may interact with other narcotic pain medications, sedatives, tranquilizers, sleeping pills, muscle relaxers, other medicines that can make you sleepy or slow your breathing, pentazocine, nalbuphine, butorphanol, or buprenorphine. Tell your doctor all medications and supplements you use. This opioid is often the drug of choice for addictive use and can easily lead to dependency. Some patients may develop tolerance for Oxycodone and need to be slowly weaned off the drug. Safety has not been established in children under age 18; caution or avoidance is suggested in pregnant and breastfeeding women as infants can be born with opioid tolerance and depressed respirations. In addition, low concentrations of Oxycodone have been found in breast milk.

How Should Tramadol Be Taken?

Good pain management practice dictates that the dose of Tramadol be individualized according to patient need using the lowest beneficial dose. Tramadol may interact with other drugs including monoamine oxidase inhibitors (MAOIs) and other antidepressant medications. There are no adequate and well-controlled studies of Tramadol in pregnant women. Tramadol should be used during pregnancy only if the potential benefit justifies the potential risk to the fetus. Tramadol passes into breast milk and may harm a nursing baby. Breastfeeding while taking Tramadol is not recommended.

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References

FDA. Oxycodone Drug Information.
https://www.accessdata.fda.gov/drugsatfda_docs/label/2009/020553s060lbl.pdf
FDA. Tramadol Product Information.
https://www.accessdata.fda.gov/drugsatfda_docs/label/2010/022370s000lbl.pdf

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