How Do Potassium Channel Blockers Work?

Reviewed on 1/12/2022

HOW DO POTASSIUM CHANNEL BLOCKERS WORK?

Potassium channel blockers are a class of drugs used for treating arrhythmias (improper beating of the heart, whether irregular, too fast or too slow). They also improve movement in people with multiple sclerosis.

In multiple sclerosis, the nerve cells do not have myelin sheets (demyelination). As a result, the potassium channels get exposed, leading to the leakage of potassium ions. When potassium starts to leak, there is a decrease in the nerve excitability or action potential, and the communication between the nerve and muscles does not occur. Thus, the muscles fail to work.

Potassium channel blockers inhibit the potassium channel in the central nervous system and prolong action potential. They help to improve movement in people with multiple sclerosis.

HOW ARE POTASSIUM CHANNEL BLOCKERS USED?

Potassium channel blockers are used for treating:

  • Arrhythmia
  • Movement disorders associated with multiple sclerosis

WHAT ARE SIDE EFFECTS OF POTASSIUM CHANNEL BLOCKERS?

Potassium channel blockers can cause the following side effects:

The information contained herein is not intended to cover all possible side effects, precautions, warnings, drug interactions, allergic reactions, or adverse effects. Check with your doctor or pharmacist to make sure these drugs do not cause any harm when you take them along with other medicines. Never stop taking your medication and never change your dose or frequency without consulting your doctor.

WHAT ARE NAMES OF POTASSIUM CHANNEL BLOCKERS?

Generic and brand names of potassium channel blockers include:

QUESTION

In the U.S., 1 in every 4 deaths is caused by heart disease. See Answer
References
https://reference.medscape.com/drugs/potassium-channel-blockers

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