Praluent

Last updated on RxList: 4/12/2021
Praluent Side Effects Center

What Is Praluent?

Praluent (alirocumab) injection is a PCSK9 (Proprotein Convertase Subtilisin Kexin Type 9) inhibitor antibody indicated as adjunct to diet and maximally tolerated statin therapy for the treatment of adults with heterozygous familial hypercholesterolemia or clinical atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease, who require additional lowering of LDL-cholesterol (LDL-C).

What Are Side Effects of Praluent?

Common side effects of Praluent include:

Dosage for Praluent

The recommended starting dose for Praluent is 75 mg administered subcutaneously once every 2 weeks.

What Drugs, Substances, or Supplements Interact with Praluent?

Praluent may interact with other drugs.

Praluent During Pregnancy and Breastfeeding

Tell your doctor all medications and supplements you use. It is unknown if Praluent would affect a fetus. Tell your doctor if you are pregnant or plan to become pregnant before receiving Praluent. Consult your doctor before breastfeeding.

Additional Information

Our Praluent (alirocumab) injection Side Effects Drug Center provides a comprehensive view of available drug information on the potential side effects when taking this medication.

This is not a complete list of side effects and others may occur. Call your doctor for medical advice about side effects. You may report side effects to FDA at 1-800-FDA-1088.

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Praluent Consumer Information

Get emergency medical help if you have signs of an allergic reaction: hives, severe itching; difficult breathing; swelling of your face, lips, tongue, or throat.

Common side effects may include:

  • redness, itching, soreness, or swelling where an injection was given;
  • flu symptoms; or
  • cold symptoms such as stuffy nose, sneezing, sore throat.

This is not a complete list of side effects and others may occur. Call your doctor for medical advice about side effects. You may report side effects to FDA at 1-800-FDA-1088.

Read the entire detailed patient monograph for Praluent (Alirocumab for Solution for Subcutaneous Injection)

SLIDESHOW

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Praluent Professional Information

SIDE EFFECTS

The following adverse reactions are also discussed in the other sections of the labeling:

  • Hypersensitivity Reactions [see WARNINGS AND PRECAUTIONS]

Clinical Trials Experience

Because clinical trials are conducted under widely varying conditions, adverse reaction rates observed in the clinical trials of a drug cannot be directly compared to rates in the clinical trials of another drug and may not reflect the rates observed in practice.

The data in Table 1 are derived from 9 primary hyperlipidemia placebo-controlled trials that included 2476 patients treated with PRALUENT 75 mg and/or 150 mg every 2 weeks, including 2135 exposed for 6 months and 1999 exposed for more than 1 year (median treatment duration of 65 weeks). The mean age of the population was 59 years, 40% of the population were women, 90% were White, 4% were Black or African American, and 3% were Asian.

Adverse reactions reported in at least 2% of PRALUENT-treated patients, and more frequently than in placebo-treated patients, are shown in Table 1.

Table 1: Adverse Reactions Occurring in >2% of PRALUENT-Treated Patients and More Frequently Than with Placebo

Adverse Reactions Placebo
(N=1276)
%
PRALUENTa
(N=2476)
%
Nasopharyngitis 11.1 11.3
Injection site reactionsb 5.1 7.2
Influenza 4.6 5.7
Urinary tract infection 4.6 4.8
Diarrhea 4.4 4.7
Bronchitis 3.8 4.3
Myalgia 3.4 4.2
Muscle spasms 2.4 3.1
Sinusitis 2.7 3.0
Cough 2.3 2.5
Contusion 1.3 2.1
Musculoskeletal pain 1.6 2.1
a 75 mg every 2 weeks and 150 mg every 2 weeks combined
b Includes erythema/redness, itching, swelling, pain/tenderness

Adverse reactions led to discontinuation of treatment in 5.3% of patients treated with PRALUENT and 5.1% of patients treated with placebo. The most common adverse reactions leading to treatment discontinuation in patients treated with PRALUENT were allergic reactions (0.6% versus 0.2% for PRALUENT and placebo, respectively) and elevated liver enzymes (0.3% versus <0.1%).

In an analysis of ezetimibe-controlled trials in which 864 patients were exposed to PRALUENT for a median of 27 weeks and 618 patients were exposed to ezetimibe for a median of 24 weeks, the types and frequencies of common adverse reactions were similar to those listed above.

In a cardiovascular outcomes trial in which 9451 patients were exposed to PRALUENT for a median of 31 months and 9443 patients were exposed to placebo for a median of 32 months, common adverse reactions (greater than 5% of patients treated with PRALUENT and occurring more frequently than placebo) included non-cardiac chest pain (7.0% PRALUENT, 6.8% placebo), nasopharyngitis (6.0% PRALUENT, 5.6% placebo), and myalgia (5.6% PRALUENT, 5.3% placebo).

In the HoFH placebo-controlled trial in which 45 patients were exposed to PRALUENT for a median of 12 weeks and 24 patients were exposed to placebo for a median of 12 weeks, no additional adverse reactions were identified.

Local Injection Site Reactions

In a pool of placebo-controlled trials evaluating PRALUENT 75 mg and/or 150 mg administered every 2 weeks, local injection site reactions including erythema/redness, itching, swelling, and pain/tenderness were reported more frequently in patients treated with PRALUENT (7.2% versus 5.1% for PRALUENT and placebo, respectively). Few patients discontinued treatment because of these reactions (0.2% versus 0.4% for PRALUENT and placebo, respectively), but patients receiving PRALUENT had a greater number of injection site reactions, had more reports of associated symptoms, and had reactions of longer average duration than patients receiving placebo.

In a 48-week placebo-controlled trial evaluating PRALUENT 300 mg every 4 weeks and 75 mg every 2 weeks, in which all patients received an injection of drug or placebo every 2 weeks, local injection site reactions were reported more frequently in patients treated with PRALUENT 300 mg every 4 weeks as compared to those receiving PRALUENT 75 mg every 2 weeks or placebo (16.6%, 9.6%, and 7.9%, respectively). Three patients (0.7%) treated with PRALUENT 300 mg every 4 weeks discontinued treatment due to local injection site reactions versus no patients (0%) in the other 2 treatment groups.

In a cardiovascular outcomes trial, local injection site reactions were reported in 3.8% of patients treated with PRALUENT versus 2.1% patients treated with placebo, and led to permanent discontinuation in 26 patients (0.3%) versus 3 patients (<0.1%), respectively.

Hypersensitivity Reactions

Hypersensitivity reactions were reported more frequently in patients treated with PRALUENT than in those treated with placebo (8.6% versus 7.8%). The most common hypersensitivity reaction was pruritus (1.1% versus 0.4% for PRALUENT and placebo, respectively). The proportion of patients who discontinued treatment due to allergic reactions was higher among those treated with PRALUENT (0.6% versus 0.2%).

Serious allergic reactions, such as hypersensitivity, nummular eczema, and hypersensitivity vasculitis were reported in patients using PRALUENT in controlled clinical trials.

Liver Enzyme Abnormalities

In the primary hyperlipidemia trials, liver-related disorders (primarily related to abnormalities in liver enzymes) were reported in 2.5% of patients treated with PRALUENT and 1.8% of patients treated with placebo, leading to treatment discontinuation in 0.4% and 0.2% of patients, respectively. Increases in serum transaminases to greater than 3 times the upper limit of normal occurred in 1.7% of patients treated with PRALUENT and 1.4% of patients treated with placebo.

Immunogenicity

As with all therapeutic proteins, there is a potential for immunogenicity with PRALUENT. The detection of antibody formation is highly dependent on the sensitivity and specificity of the assay. Additionally, the observed incidence of antibody (including neutralizing antibody) positivity in an assay may be influenced by several factors including assay methodology, sample handling, timing of sample collection, concomitant medications, and underlying disease. For these reasons, comparison of the incidence of antibodies to PRALUENT in the studies described below with the incidence of antibodies in other studies or to other products may be misleading.

In a cardiovascular outcomes trial, 5.5% (504/9091) of patients treated with PRALUENT 75 mg and/or 150 mg every 2 weeks had anti-drug antibodies (ADA) detected after initiating treatment compared with 1.6% (149/9097) of patients treated with placebo. Persistent ADA responses, defined as at least 2 consecutive post-baseline samples with positive ADA separated by at least a 16-week period, were observed in 0.7% of patients treated with PRALUENT and 0.4% of patients treated with placebo. Neutralizing antibody (NAb) responses were observed in 0.5% of patients treated with PRALUENT and in <0.1% of patients treated with placebo. Efficacy based on reductions in LDL-C was mostly similar in patients with or without ADA. However, some patients treated with PRALUENT with persistent or neutralizing antibodies experienced attenuation in LDL-C efficacy.

A higher incidence of injection site reactions were observed in patients with treatment-emergent ADA compared to patients who were ADA negative (7.5% vs 3.6%). In a pool of ten placebo-controlled and active-controlled trials of patients treated with PRALUENT 75 mg and/or 150 mg every 2 weeks as well as in a separate clinical study of patients treated with PRALUENT 75 mg every 2 weeks or 300 mg every 4 weeks (including some patients with dose adjustment to 150 mg every 2 weeks), the incidence of detecting ADA and NAb was similar to the results from the trial described above.

The long-term consequences of continuing PRALUENT treatment in the presence of ADA are unknown.

Postmarketing Experience

The following adverse reactions have been reported during post-approval use of PRALUENT. Because these reactions are reported voluntarily from a population of uncertain size, it is not always possible to reliably estimate their frequency or establish a causal relationship to drug exposure.

  • Hypersensitivity reactions: Angioedema
  • Influenza-like illness

DRUG INTERACTIONS

No Information Provided

Read the entire FDA prescribing information for Praluent (Alirocumab for Solution for Subcutaneous Injection)

© Praluent Patient Information is supplied by Cerner Multum, Inc. and Praluent Consumer information is supplied by First Databank, Inc., used under license and subject to their respective copyrights.

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