Prexxartan

Last reviewed on RxList: 12/28/2017
Prexxartan Side Effects Center

Last reviewed on RxList 12/28/2017

Prexxartan (valsartan) is an angiotensin II receptor blocker (ARB) indicated for hypertension in adults and children six years and older, to lower blood pressure. Lowering blood pressure reduces the risk of fatal and nonfatal cardiovascular events, primarily strokes and myocardial infarctions; Heart failure (NYHA class II-IV): Prexxartan significantly reduces hospitalization for heart failure in patients who are unable to swallow valsartan tablets; and stable left ventricular failure or left ventricular dysfunction following myocardial infarction: Prexxartan reduces cardiovascular mortality in patients who are unable to swallow valsartan tablets. Common side effects of Prexxartan include:

The dose of Prexxartan depends on the condition being treated, and ranges from 20 to 160 mg twice daily. Prexxartan may interact with potassium-sparing diuretics, potassium supplements, salt substitutes containing potassium, heparin, nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs), ACE inhibitors, aliskiren, and lithium. Tell your doctor all medications and supplements you use. Tell your doctor if you are pregnant or plan to become pregnant before using Prexxartan; it may harm a fetus. It is unknown if Prexxartan passes into breast milk. Due to the potential for adverse effects in nursing infants, breastfeeding is not recommended while using Prexxartan.

Our Prexxartan (valsartan) Oral Solution Side Effects Drug Center provides a comprehensive view of available drug information on the potential side effects when taking this medication.

This is not a complete list of side effects and others may occur. Call your doctor for medical advice about side effects. You may report side effects to FDA at 1-800-FDA-1088.

SLIDESHOW

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Prexxartan Professional Information

SIDE EFFECTS

Clinical Studies Experience

Because clinical studies are conducted under widely varying conditions, adverse reaction rates observed in the clinical studies of a drug cannot be directly compared to rates in the clinical studies of another drug and may not reflect the rates observed in practice.

Adult Hypertension

Valsartan has been evaluated for safety in more than 4,000 patients, including over 400 treated for over 6 months, and more than 160 for over 1 year. Adverse reactions have generally been mild and transient in nature and have only infrequently required discontinuation of therapy. The overall incidence of adverse reactions with valsartan was similar to placebo.

The overall frequency of adverse reactions was neither dose-related nor related to gender, age, race, or regimen. Discontinuation of therapy due to side effects was required in 2.3% of valsartan patients and 2.0% of placebo patients. The most common reasons for discontinuation of therapy with valsartan were headache and dizziness.

The adverse reactions that occurred in placebo-controlled clinical trials in at least 1% of patients treated with valsartan and at a higher incidence in valsartan (n=2,316) than placebo (n=888) patients included fatigue (2% vs. 1%) and abdominal pain (2% vs. 1%).

Headache, dizziness, upper respiratory infection, cough, diarrhea, rhinitis, sinusitis, nausea, pharyngitis, edema, and arthralgia occurred at a more than 1% rate, but at about the same incidence in placebo and valsartan patients.

In trials in which valsartan was compared to an ACE inhibitor with or without placebo, the incidence of dry cough was significantly greater in the ACE-inhibitor group (7.9%) than in the groups who received valsartan (2.6%) or placebo (1.5%).

In a 129-patient trial limited to patients who had had dry cough when they had previously received ACE inhibitors, the incidences of cough in patients who received valsartan, HCTZ, or lisinopril were 20%, 19%, and 69% respectively (p <0.001).

Dose-related orthostatic effects were seen in less than 1% of patients. An increase in the incidence of dizziness was observed in patients treated with valsartan 320 mg (8%) compared to 10 to 160 mg (2% to 4%).

Valsartan has been used concomitantly with hydrochlorothiazide without evidence of clinically important adverse interactions.

Other adverse reactions that occurred in controlled clinical trials of patients treated with valsartan (>0.2% of valsartan patients) are listed below. It cannot be determined whether these events were causally related to valsartan.

Body as a Whole: Allergic reaction and asthenia

Cardiovascular: Palpitations

Dermatologic: Pruritus and rash

Digestive: Constipation, dry mouth, dyspepsia, and flatulence

Musculoskeletal: Back pain, muscle cramps, and myalgia

Neurologic and Psychiatric: Anxiety, insomnia, paresthesia, and somnolence

Respiratory: Dyspnea

Special Senses: Vertigo

Urogenital: Impotence

Other reported events seen less frequently in clinical trials included chest pain, syncope, anorexia, vomiting, and angioedema.

Pediatric Hypertension

Valsartan has been evaluated for safety in over 400 pediatric patients aged 6 to 17 years and more than 160 pediatric patients aged 6 months to 5 years. No relevant differences were identified between the adverse experience profile for pediatric patients aged 6 to 16 years and that previously reported for adult patients. Headache and hyperkalemia were the most common adverse events suspected to be study drug-related in older children (6 to 17 years old) and younger children (6 months to 5 years old), respectively. Hyperkalemia was mainly observed in children with underlying renal disease.

Neurocognitive and developmental assessment of pediatric patients aged 6 to 16 years revealed no overall clinically relevant adverse impact after treatment with valsartan for up to 1 year.

Valsartan is not recommended for pediatric patients under 6 years of age. In a study (n=90) of pediatric patients (1 to 5 years), two deaths and three cases of on-treatment transaminase elevations were seen in the one-year open-label extension phase. These 5 events occurred in a study population in which patients frequently had significant co-morbidities. A causal relationship to valsartan has not been established. In a second study of 6-months duration in 75 children aged 1 to 5 years, there were no deaths; one case of marked liver transaminase elevations occurred following 6 months of treatment.

Heart Failure

The adverse experience profile of valsartan in heart failure patients was consistent with the pharmacology of the drug and the health status of the patients. In the Valsartan Heart Failure Trial, comparing valsartan in total daily doses up to 320 mg (n=2,506) to placebo (n=2,494), 10% of valsartan patients discontinued for adverse reactions vs. 7% of placebo patients.

The table shows adverse reactions in double-blind short-term heart failure trials, including the first 4 months of the Valsartan Heart Failure Trial, with an incidence of at least 2% that were more frequent in valsartan-treated patients than in placebo-treated patients. All patients received standard drug therapy for heart failure, frequently as multiple medications, which could include diuretics, digitalis, beta-blockers. About 93% of patients received concomitant ACE inhibitors.

  Valsartan
(n=3,282)
Placebo
(n=2,740)
Dizziness 17% 9%
Hypotension 7% 2%
Diarrhea 5% 4%
Arthralgia 3% 2%
Fatigue 3% 2%
Back Pain 3% 2%
Dizziness, postural 2% 1%
Hyperkalemia 2% 1%
Hypotension, postural 2% 1%

Discontinuations occurred in 0.5% of valsartan-treated patients and 0.1% of placebo patients for each of the following: elevations in creatinine and elevations in potassium.

Other adverse reactions with an incidence greater than 1% and greater than placebo included headache, nausea, renal impairment, syncope, blurred vision, upper abdominal pain and vertigo.

From the long-term data in the Valsartan Heart Failure Trial, there did not appear to be any significant adverse reactions not previously identified.

Post-Myocardial Infarction

The safety profile of valsartan was consistent with the pharmacology of the drug and the background diseases, cardiovascular risk factors, and clinical course of patients treated in the post-myocardial infarction setting. The table shows the percentage of patients discontinued in the valsartan and captopril-treated groups in the Valsartan in Acute Myocardial Infarction Trial (VALIANT) with a rate of at least 0.5% in either of the treatment groups.

Discontinuations due to renal dysfunction occurred in 1.1% of valsartan-treated patients and 0.8% of captopril-treated patients.

  Valsartan
(n=4,885)
Captopril
(n=4,879)
Discontinuation for adverse reaction 5.8% 7.7%
Adverse reactions
Hypotension NOS 1.4% 0.8%
Cough 0.6% 2.5%
Blood creatinine increased 0.6% 0.4%
Rash NOS 0.2% 0.6%

In controlled clinical trials, clinically important changes in standard laboratory parameters were rarely associated with administration of valsartan.

Creatinine

Minor elevations in creatinine occurred in 0.8% of patients taking valsartan and 0.6% given placebo in controlled clinical trials of hypertensive patients. In heart failure trials, greater than 50% increases in creatinine were observed in 3.9% of valsartan-treated patients compared to 0.9% of placebo-treated patients. In post-myocardial infarction patients, doubling of serum creatinine was observed in 4.2% of valsartan-treated patients and 3.4% of captopril-treated patients.

Hemoglobin And Hematocrit

Greater than 20% decreases in hemoglobin and hematocrit were observed in 0.4% and 0.8%, respectively, of valsartan patients, compared with 0.1% and 0.1% in placebo-treated patients.

Liver Function Tests

Occasional elevations (greater than 150%) of liver chemistries occurred in valsartan-treated patients. Three patients (<0.1%) treated with valsartan discontinued treatment for elevated liver chemistries.

Neutropenia

Neutropenia was observed in 1.9% of patients treated with valsartan and 0.8% of patients treated with placebo.

Serum Potassium

In hypertensive patients, greater than 20% increases in serum potassium were observed in 4.4% of valsartan-treated patients compared to 2.9% of placebo-treated patients. In heart failure patients, greater than 20% increases in serum potassium were observed in 10.0% of valsartan-treated patients compared to 5.1% of placebo-treated patients.

Blood Urea Nitrogen (BUN)

In heart failure trials, greater than 50% increases in BUN were observed in 16.6% of valsartan-treated patients compared to 6.3% of placebo-treated patients.

Postmarketing Experience

The following additional adverse reactions have been reported in postmarketing experience:

Hypersensitivity: There are rare reports of angioedema. Some of these patients previously experienced angioedema with other drugs including ACE inhibitors. Valsartan should not be re-administered to patients who have had angioedema.

Digestive: Elevated liver enzymes and very rare reports of hepatitis

Renal: Impaired renal function, renal failure

Clinical Laboratory Tests: Hyperkalemia

Dermatologic: Alopecia, bullous dermatitis

Blood and Lymphatic: There are very rare reports of thrombocytopenia.

Vascular: Vasculitis

Rare cases of rhabdomyolysis have been reported in patients receiving angiotensin II receptor blockers.

Because these reactions are reported voluntarily from a population of uncertain size, it is not possible to estimate their frequency reliably or establish a causal relationship to drug exposure.

Read the entire FDA prescribing information for Prexxartan (Valsartan Oral Solution)

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© Prexxartan Patient Information is supplied by Cerner Multum, Inc. and Prexxartan Consumer information is supplied by First Databank, Inc., used under license and subject to their respective copyrights.

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