Propranolol Hydrochloride Injection

Last updated on RxList: 3/12/2018
Propranolol Hydrochloride Injection Side Effects Center

Last reviewed on RxList 3/12/2018

Propranolol hydrochloride injection is a synthetic beta-adrenergic receptor blocking agent (beta-blocker) used to treat life-threatening arrhythmias or those occurring under anesthesia. Propranolol hydrochloride injection is available in generic form. Common side effects of propranolol hydrochloride injection include:

The usual dose of propranolol hydrochloride is 1 to 3 mg administered under careful monitoring, such as electrocardiography and central venous pressure. Propranolol hydrochloride may interact with antiarrhythmic drugs, calcium channel blockers, ACE inhibitors, alpha-blockers, reserpine, epinephrine, dobutamine, isoproterenol, nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs), antidepressants, anesthetics, warfarin, propranolol, haloperidol, and thyroxine. Tell your doctor all medications and supplements you use. During pregnancy, propranolol hydrochloride should be used only if prescribed. Propranolol passes into breast milk. Consult your doctor before breastfeeding.

Our Propranolol hydrochloride injection Side Effects Drug Center provides a comprehensive view of available drug information on the potential side effects when taking this medication.

This is not a complete list of side effects and others may occur. Call your doctor for medical advice about side effects. You may report side effects to FDA at 1-800-FDA-1088.

SLIDESHOW

Heart Disease: Symptoms, Signs, and Causes See Slideshow
Propranolol Hydrochloride Injection Consumer Information

Get emergency medical help if you have signs of an allergic reaction: hives; difficult breathing; swelling of your face, lips, tongue, or throat.

Call your doctor at once if you have:

  • slow or uneven heartbeats;
  • a light-headed feeling, like you might pass out;
  • wheezing or trouble breathing;
  • shortness of breath (even with mild exertion), swelling, rapid weight gain;
  • sudden weakness, vision problems, or loss of coordination (especially in a child with hemangioma that affects the face or head);
  • cold feeling in your hands and feet;
  • depression, confusion, hallucinations;
  • liver problems--nausea, upper stomach pain, itching, tired feeling, loss of appetite, dark urine, clay-colored stools, jaundice (yellowing of the skin or eyes);
  • low blood sugar--headache, hunger, weakness, sweating, confusion, irritability, dizziness, fast heart rate, or feeling jittery;
  • low blood sugar in a baby--pale skin, blue or purple skin, sweating, fussiness, crying, not wanting to eat, feeling cold, drowsiness, weak or shallow breathing (breathing may stop for short periods), seizure (convulsions), or loss of consciousness; or
  • severe skin reaction--fever, sore throat, swelling in your face or tongue, burning in your eyes, skin pain, followed by a red or purple skin rash that spreads (especially in the face or upper body) and causes blistering and peeling.

Common side effects may include:

  • nausea, vomiting, diarrhea, constipation, stomach cramps;
  • decreased sex drive, impotence, or difficulty having an orgasm;
  • sleep problems (insomnia); or
  • tired feeling.

This is not a complete list of side effects and others may occur. Call your doctor for medical advice about side effects. You may report side effects to FDA at 1-800-FDA-1088.

Read the entire detailed patient monograph for Propranolol Hydrochloride Injection (Propranolol Hydrochloride Injection)

QUESTION

In the U.S., 1 in every 4 deaths is caused by heart disease. See Answer
Propranolol Hydrochloride Injection Professional Information

SIDE EFFECTS

In a series of 225 patients, there were 6 deaths (see Clinical Studies). Cardiovascular events (hypotension, congestive heart failure, bradycardia, and heart block) were the most common. The only other event reported by more than one patient was nausea.

Other adverse events for intravenous propranolol, reported during post-marketing surveillance include cardiac arrest, dyspnea, and cutaneous ulcers.

The following adverse events have been reported with use of formulations of sustained- or immediate-release oral propranolol and may be expected with intravenous propranolol.

Cardiovascular

Bradycardia; congestive heart failure; intensification of AV block; hypotension; paresthesia of hands; thrombocytopenic purpura; arterial insufficiency, usually of the Raynaud type.

Central Nervous System

Light-headedness; mental depression manifested by insomnia, lassitude, weakness, fatigue; reversible mental depression progressing to catatonia; visual disturbances; hallucinations; vivid dreams; an acute reversible syndrome characterized by disorientation for time and place, short-term memory loss, emotional lability, slightly clouded sensorium, and decreased performance on neuropsychometrics. For immediate-release formulations, fatigue, lethargy, and vivid dreams appear dose related.

Gastrointestinal

Nausea, vomiting, epigastric distress, abdominal cramping, diarrhea, constipation, mesenteric arterial thrombosis, ischemic colitis.

Allergic

Pharyngitis and agranulocytosis; erythematous rash, fever combined with aching and sore throat; laryngospasm, and respiratory distress.

Respiratory

Bronchospasm.

Hematologic

Agranulocytosis, nonthrombocytopenic purpura, thrombocytopenic purpura.

Autoimmune

In extremely rare instances, systemic lupus erythematosus has been reported.

Miscellaneous

Alopecia, LE-like reactions, psoriaform rashes, dry eyes, male impotence, and Peyronie's disease have been reported rarely. Oculomucocutaneous reactions involving the skin, serous membranes and conjunctivae reported for a beta-blocker (practolol) have not been associated with propranolol.

Read the entire FDA prescribing information for Propranolol Hydrochloride Injection (Propranolol Hydrochloride Injection)

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© Propranolol Hydrochloride Injection Patient Information is supplied by Cerner Multum, Inc. and Propranolol Hydrochloride Injection Consumer information is supplied by First Databank, Inc., used under license and subject to their respective copyrights.

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