Proscar vs. Avodart

Are Proscar and Avodart the Same Thing?

Proscar (finasteride) and Avodart (dutasteride) are used to treat symptoms of benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH) in men with an enlarged prostate.

Both Proscar and Avodart are 5-alpha reductase inhibitors, but Proscar is an inhibitor of only the type II 5a-reductase, while Avodart is an inhibitor of both type I and type II 5a-reductase.

What Are Possible Side Effects of Proscar?

Common side effects of Proscar include:

In some men, Proscar can decrease the amount of semen released during sex. This is harmless. Proscar may also increase hair growth. The sexual side effects of Proscar may continue after you stop taking it. Talk to your doctor if you have concerns about these side effects.

What Are Possible Side Effects of Avodart?

Common side effects of Avodart include:

  • sexual problems (such as decreased sexual interest/ability, decrease in the amount of semen/sperm released during sex),
  • impotence (trouble getting or keeping an erection),
  • testicle pain or swelling,
  • increased breast size, or
  • breast tenderness.

What Is Proscar?

Proscar (finasteride) is an inhibitor of steroid Type II 5a-reductase, that works by decreasing the amount of a natural body hormone dihydrotestosterone (DHT) that causes growth of the prostate, and is used to treat symptoms of benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH) in men with an enlarged prostate. Proscar is available in generic form.

What Is Avodart?

Avodart (dutasteride) is a synthetic 4-azasteroid compound that is a selective inhibitor of both the type 1 and type 2 isoforms of steroid 5 alpha-reductase used to treat benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH) in men with an enlarged prostate. Avodart helps improve urinary flow and may also reduce the need for prostate surgery later. Avodart is sometimes given with another medication called tamsulosin (Flomax). Avodart prevents the conversion of testosterone to dihydrotestosterone (DHT) in the body. Avodart may be available in generic form.

SLIDESHOW

Signs of Prostate Cancer: Symptoms, PSA Test, Treatments See Slideshow

What Drugs Interact With Proscar?

Proscar may interact with other drugs.

What Drugs Interact With Avodart?

may interact with conivaptan, imatinib, isoniazid, antibiotics, antifungal medications, antidepressants, heart or blood pressure medications, or HIV/AIDS medicine.

How Should Proscar Be Taken?

The recommended dose of Proscar is one tablet (5 mg) taken once a day.

How Should Avodart Be Taken?

The recommended dose of Avodart is 1 capsule (0.5 mg) taken once daily.

QUESTION

The prostate is about the size of a _____________. See Answer
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References
Medical Editor: John P. Cunha, DO, FACOEP

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