How Do Pyrimidine Synthesis Inhibitors Work?

Reviewed on 1/12/2022

HOW DO PYRIMIDINE SYNTHESIS INHIBITORS WORK?

Pyrimidine synthesis inhibitors are drugs used for the treatment of multiple sclerosis

Multiple sclerosis is an autoimmune disease where the immune system attacks the central nervous system. The production of pyrimidine is responsible for the activation and multiplication of white blood cells (lymphocytes). Multiplication of lymphocytes leads to the inflammatory response associated with multiple sclerosis.

Pyrimidine synthesis inhibitors inhibit the action of an enzyme called dihydro-orotate dehydrogenase, responsible for pyrimidine production. Thus, they are responsible for blocking lymphocyte activation and inflammatory response.

HOW ARE PYRIMIDINE SYNTHESIS INHIBITORS USED?

Pyrimidine synthesis inhibitors are mainly used for treating multiple sclerosis.

WHAT ARE SIDE EFFECTS OF PYRIMIDINE SYNTHESIS INHIBITORS?

The most common side effects of pyrimidine synthesis inhibitors include:

The information contained herein is not intended to cover all possible side effects, precautions, warnings, drug interactions, allergic reactions, or adverse effects. Check with your doctor or pharmacist to make sure these drugs do not cause any harm when you take them along with other medicines. Never stop taking your medication and never change your dose or frequency without consulting your doctor.

WHAT ARE NAMES OF PYRIMIDINE SYNTHESIS INHIBITORS?

Generic and brand names of pyrimidine synthesis inhibitors include:

QUESTION

What kind of disease is multiple sclerosis? See Answer
References
https://reference.medscape.com/drugs/pyrimidine-synthesis-inhibitors

https://www.nationalmssociety.org/Treating-MS/Medications/Aubagio

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