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Rye Grass

What other names is Rye Grass known by?

Ballico, Cernilton, Cernitin, Extrait de Pollen d'Ivraie, Extrait de Pollen de Plante Herbacée, Grass Pollen, Grass Pollen Extract, Ivraie, Pollen d'Ivraie, Pollen de Plante Herbacée, Raygrás, Ray-Grass, Rye, Rye Grass Pollen, Rye Grass Pollen Extract, Secale cereale.

What is Rye Grass?

Rye grass is a plant. The rye grass pollen is used to make medicine. Rye grass pollen extract (Cernilton) is a registered pharmaceutical product in Western Europe, Japan, Korea, and Argentina.

Rye grass is used for prostate conditions such as benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH), prostate pain, and ongoing inflammation of the prostate.

Possibly Effective for...

  • Symptoms of an enlarged prostate (benign prostatic hyperplasia, BPH) including increased urinary frequency, increased nighttime urination, constant feeling of needing to urinate, dribbling, painful urination, and decreased urine flow rate. While taking rye grass extract seems to improve symptoms of an enlarged prostate, there are mixed research findings about whether or not it actually affects the size of the prostate. It is not known if rye grass pollen extract works as well as prescription drugs such as finasteride (Proscar) or alpha-blockers. However, rye grass does seem to work about as well as Pygeum and Paraprost, a Japanese prostate remedy containing L-glutamic acid, L-alanine, and aminoacetic acid.

Insufficient Evidence to Rate Effectiveness for...

  • Shrinking an enlarged prostate, prostate swelling, and pain. Developing evidence suggests that rye grass pollen extract might help these conditions.
  • Other conditions.
More evidence is needed to rate the effectiveness of rye grass for these uses.

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How does Rye Grass work?

Rye grass decreases swelling (inflammation) by interfering with certain chemicals. It might also slow down prostate cancer cell growth.

Are there safety concerns?

Rye grass seems safe for most people. It can cause side effects such as stomach swelling (distention), heartburn, and nausea.

Special Precautions & Warnings:

Pregnancy and breast-feeding: Not enough is known about the use of rye grass during pregnancy and breast-feeding. Stay on the safe side and avoid use.

Dosing considerations for Rye Grass.

The following doses have been studied in scientific research:

BY MOUTH:

  • For benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH): 126 mg of a specific rye grass pollen extract, three times daily.

Natural Medicines Comprehensive Database rates effectiveness based on scientific evidence according to the following scale: Effective, Likely Effective, Possibly Effective, Possibly Ineffective, Likely Ineffective, and Insufficient Evidence to Rate (detailed description of each of the ratings).

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Reviewed on 9/17/2019
References

Buck AC, Cox R, Rees RW, et al. Treatment of outflow tract obstruction due to benign prostatic hyperplasia with the pollen extract, cernilton. A double-blind, placebo-controlled study. Br J Urol 1990;66:398-404. View abstract.

Buck AC, Rees RW, Ebeling L. Treatment of chronic prostatitis and prostatodynia with pollen extract. Br J Urol 1989;64:496-9. View abstract.

Dutkiewicz S. Usefulness of Cernilton in the treatment of benign prostatic hyperplasia. Int Urol Nephrol 1996;28:49-53.. View abstract.

Habib FK, Ross M, Lewenstein A, et al. Identification of a prostate inhibitory substance in a pollen extract. Prostate 1995;26:133-9. View abstract.

Loschen G, Ebeling L. [Inhibition of arachidonic acid cascade by extract of rye pollen]. Arzneimittelforschung 1991;41:162-7. View abstract.

Lowe FC, Dreikorn K, Borkowski A, et al. Review of recent placebo-controlled trials utilizing phytotherapeutic agents for treatment of BPH. Prostate 1998;37:187-93. View abstract.

Lowe FC, Ku JC. Phytotherapy in treatment of benign prostatic hyperplasia: a critical review. Urol 1996;48:12-20. View abstract.

MacDonald R, Ishani A, Rutks I, Wilt TJ. A systematic review of Cernilton for the treatment of benign prostatic hyperplasia. BJU Int 2000;85:836-41. View abstract.

Maekawa M, Kishimoto T, Yasumoto R, et al. [Clinical evaluation of Cernilton on benign prostatic hypertrophy--a multiple center double-blind study with Paraprost]. Hinyokika Kiyo 1990;36:495-516. View abstract.

Rugendorff EW, Weidner W, Ebeling L, Buck AC. Results of treatment with pollen extract (Cernilton N) in chronic prostatitis and prostatodynia. Br J Urol 1993;71:433-8. View abstract.

Yasumoto R, Kawanishi H, Tsujino T, et al. Clinical evaluation of long-term treatment using cernitin pollen extract in patients with benign prostatic hyperplasia. Clin Ther 1995;17:82-7. View abstract.

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