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Selenium

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Are there any interactions with medications?



Medications that decrease the immune system (Immunosuppressants)
Interaction Rating: Moderate Be cautious with this combination.
Talk with your health provider.

Selenium might stimulate the immune system. By stimulating the immune system, selenium might decrease the effectiveness of medications that decrease the immune system.

Some medications that decrease the immune system include azathioprine (Imuran), basiliximab (Simulect), cyclosporine (Neoral, Sandimmune), daclizumab (Zenapax), muromonab-CD3 (OKT3, Orthoclone OKT3), mycophenolate (CellCept), tacrolimus (FK506, Prograf), sirolimus (Rapamune), prednisone (Deltasone, Orasone), and other corticosteroids (glucocorticoids).



Medications that slow blood clotting (Anticoagulant / Antiplatelet drugs)
Interaction Rating: Moderate Be cautious with this combination.
Talk with your health provider.

Selenium might slow blood clotting. Taking selenium along with medications that also slow blood clotting might increase the chances of bruising and bleeding.

Some medications that slow blood clotting include aspirin, clopidogrel (Plavix), dalteparin (Fragmin), enoxaparin (Lovenox), heparin, ticlopidine (Ticlid), warfarin (Coumadin), and others.



Medications used for lowering cholesterol (Statins)
Interaction Rating: Moderate Be cautious with this combination.
Talk with your health provider.

Taking selenium, beta-carotene, vitamin C, and vitamin E together might decrease the effectiveness of some medications used for lowering cholesterol. It is not known if selenium alone decreases the effectiveness of medications used for lowering cholesterol.

Some medications used for lowering cholesterol include atorvastatin (Lipitor), fluvastatin (Lescol), lovastatin (Mevacor), and pravastatin (Pravachol).



Niacin
Interaction Rating: Moderate Be cautious with this combination.
Talk with your health provider.

Taking selenium along with vitamin E, vitamin C, and beta-carotene might decrease some of the beneficial effects of niacin. Niacin can increase levels of good cholesterol. Taking selenium along with these other vitamins might decrease how well niacin works for increasing good cholesterol.



Sedative medications (Barbiturates)
Interaction Rating: Moderate Be cautious with this combination.
Talk with your health provider.

The body breaks down medications to get rid of them. Selenium might slow how fast the body breaks down sedative medications (barbiturates). Taking selenium with these medications might increase the effects and side effects of these medications.



Warfarin (Coumadin)
Interaction Rating: Moderate Be cautious with this combination.
Talk with your health provider.

Selenium might thin the blood. Selenium might also increase the effects of warfarin in the body. Taking selenium along with warfarin might increase the chances of bruising and bleeding.



Birth control pills (Contraceptive drugs)
Interaction Rating: Minor Be cautious with this combination.
Talk with your health provider.

Some research shows that women who take birth control pills might have increased blood levels of selenium. However, other research shows no change in selenium levels in women who take birth control pills. There isn't enough information to know if there is an important interaction between birth control pills and selenium.

Some birth control pills include ethinyl estradiol and levonorgestrel (Triphasil), ethinyl estradiol and norethindrone (Ortho-Novum 1/35, Ortho-Novum 7/7/7), and others.



Gold salts
Interaction Rating: Minor Be cautious with this combination.
Talk with your health provider.

Gold salts bind to selenium and decrease selenium in parts of the body. This might decrease the normal activity of selenium, possibly resulting in symptoms of selenium deficiency.

Gold salts include aurothioglucose (Solganal), gold sodium thiomalate (Aurolate), and auranofin (Ridaura).

Dosing considerations for Selenium.

The following doses have been studied in scientific research:

ADULTS:

BY MOUTH:
  • U.S. recommended dietary allowance (RDA): 55 mcg for males and females; 60 mcg for pregnant females; 70 mcg for breast-feeding females. Currently, doses below the tolerable upper intake level (400 mcg) may be used in supplementation.
  • Autoimmune thyroiditis (Hashimoto's thyroiditis): 200 mcg daily.
  • Abnormal cholesterol levels: 100-200 mcg daily of a specific selenium product (SelenoPrecise, Pharma Nord, Denmark) has been used for 6 months.
BY IV:
  • Blood infection (sepsis): Sodium selenite has been given in varying doses, 100-4000 mcg by IV daily for up to 28 days. Most treatments have included a loading dose followed by reduced maintenance doses.
CHILDREN:

BY MOUTH:
  • U.S. recommended dietary allowance (RDA): 15 mcg for those 0-6 months old; 20 mcg daily for those 6-12 months old; 20 mcg for those 1-3 years old; 30 mcg for those 4-8 years old; 40 mcg for those 9-13 years old; and 55 mcg for those 14-18 years old. Adequate intake for infants up to six months old may be 2.1 mcg/kg daily, and for infants 7-12 months, it may be 2.2 mcg/kg daily.
  • Maximum daily dose: 45 mcg for those 0-6 months old; 60 mcg for those 7-12 months old; 90 mcg for those 1-3 years old; 150 mcg for those 4-8 years old; and 280 mcg for those 9-13 years old.
  • Blood infection (sepsis): Selenium has been given with zinc and glutamate along with metoclopramide by IV. Age-specific daily selenium doses include: 1-3 years = 40 mcg, 3-5 years = 100 mcg, 5-12 years = 200 mcg; adolescents 400 mcg.

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