Seroquel vs. Latuda

Are Seroquel and Latuda the Same Thing?

Seroquel (quetiapine) and Latuda (lurasidone hydrochloride) are psychotropic medications (antipsychotics) used to treat schizophrenia.

Seroquel is also to treat major depression and bipolar disorder.

What Are Possible Side Effects of Seroquel?

Common side effects of Seroquel include:

What Are Possible Side Effects of Latuda?

Common side effects of Latuda include:

Tell your doctor right if you experience serious side effects of Latuda including:

  • drooling,
  • trouble swallowing,
  • fainting,
  • signs of infection (such as persistent cough, fever)
  • fast or uneven or pounding heartbeats;
  • agitation, hostility, confusion, thoughts about hurting yourself,
  • seizures (convulsions),
  • fever, chills, body aches, flu symptoms,
  • sores in your mouth and throat,
  • high blood sugar (increased thirst, increased urination, hunger, dry mouth, fruity breath odor, drowsiness, dry skin, blurred vision, weight loss),
  • very stiff (rigid) muscles, high fever, sweating, confusion, tremors, feeling like you might pass out, or
  • twitching or uncontrollable movements of your eyes, lips, tongue, face, arms, or legs.

What Is Seroquel?

Seroquel (quetiapine) is a psychotropic medication used to treat schizophrenia in adults and children who are at least 13 years old. Seroquel is also used in the treatment of major depression and bipolar disorder.

What Is Latuda?

Latuda (lurasidone hydrochloride) is an atypical antipsychotic used to treat schizophrenia.

QUESTION

Schizophrenia is the most disabling mental illness. See Answer

What Drugs Interact With Seroquel?

Seroquel may interact with many different drugs. Tell your doctor all medications and supplements you use.

What Drugs Interact With Latuda?

Latuda may interact with other medicines that make you sleepy (such as cold or allergy medicine, sedatives, narcotic pain medicine, sleeping pills, muscle relaxers, and medicine for seizures, depression, or anxiety), antibiotics, antifungal medications, or medications to treat HIV or AIDS.

Latuda may also interact with diltiazem or rifamycins.

How Should Seroquel Be Taken?

Dosing preparations are 25, 50, 100, 200, 300, and 400 mg tablets.

  • Take Seroquel exactly as your healthcare provider tells you to take it. Do not change the dose yourself.
  • Take Seroquel by mouth, with or without food.
  • If you feel you need to stop SEROQUEL, talk with your healthcare provider first. If you suddenly stop taking SEROQUEL, you may have side effects such as trouble sleeping or trouble staying asleep (insomnia), nausea, and vomiting.
  • If you miss a dose of SEROQUEL, take it as soon as you remember. If you are close to your next dose, skip the missed dose. Just take the next dose at your regular time. Do not take 2 doses at the same time unless your healthcare provider tells you to. If you are not sure about your dosing, call your healthcare provider.

How Should Latuda Be Taken?

The recommended starting dose of Latuda is 40 mg once daily, and it has been shown to be effective in a dose range of 40 mg/day to 160 mg/day.

SLIDESHOW

Schizophrenia: Symptoms, Types, Causes, Treatment See Slideshow
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References

RxList. Seroquel Medication Guide.
https://www.rxlist.com/seroquel-drug.htm#medguide
RxList. Latuda Medication Guide.
https://www.rxlist.com/latuda-drug.htm#medguide

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