Sinemet vs. Rytary

Are Sinemet and Rytary the Same Thing?

Sinemet (carbidopa-levodopa) and Rytary (carbidopa and levodopa) are combinations of an inhibitor of aromatic amino acid decarboxylation and an aromatic amino acid used to treat Parkinson symptoms such as muscle stiffness, tremors, spasms, and poor muscle control. Sinemet and Rytary are also used to treat Parkinson symptoms caused by carbon monoxide poisoning or manganese intoxication.

What Are Possible Side Effects of Sinemet?

Common side effects of Sinemet include:

Tell your doctor if you experience unlikely but serious side effects including:
  • greatly increased eye blinking/twitching,
  • fainting,
  • mental/mood changes (e.g., confusion, depression, hallucinations, thoughts of suicide),
  • unusual strong urges (such as increased gambling, increased sexual urges),
  • or worsening of involuntary movements/spasms.

What Are Possible Side Effects of Rytary?

Common side effects of Rytary include:

SLIDESHOW

Dementia, Alzheimer's Disease, and Aging Brains See Slideshow

What Is Sinemet?

Sinemet (carbidopa-levodopa) is a combination of an inhibitor of aromatic amino acid decarboxylation and an aromatic amino acid used to treat Parkinson symptoms such as

  • muscle stiffness,
  • tremors,
  • spasms,
  • and poor muscle control.
Sinemet is also used to treat Parkinson symptoms caused by carbon monoxide poisoning or manganese intoxication.

What Is Rytary?

Rytary (carbidopa and levodopa) is a combination an inhibitor of aromatic amino acid decarboxylation and an aromatic amino acid, used for the treatment of Parkinson's disease, post-encephalitic Parkinsonism, and Parkinsonism that may follow carbon monoxide intoxication or manganese intoxication.

What Drugs Interact With Sinemet?

Sinemet may interact with metoclopramide, isoniazid, phenytoin, papaverine, antidepressants, or blood pressure medications.

Sinemet may also interact with other Parkinson's medications or medicines to treat psychiatric disorders.

What Drugs Interact With Rytary?

Rytary may interact with MAO inhibitors, phenothiazines, butyrophenones, risperidone, metoclopramide, isoniazid, iron salts, or multi-vitamins containing iron salts. Tell your doctor all medications and supplements you use. During pregnancy, Rytary should be used only if prescribed. These drugs may pass into breast milk. Consult your doctor before breastfeeding.

QUESTION

Parkinson's disease is only seen in people of advanced age. See Answer

How Should Sinemet Be Taken?

Starting dosage is one tablet of Sinemet 25-100 (carbidopa-levodopa) three times a day. Dosage may be increased by one tablet every day or every other day, as necessary, until a dosage of eight tablets a day is reached.

How Should Rytary Be Taken?

The recommended starting dosage of Rytary is 23.75 mg/95 mg taken orally three times a day for the first 3 days. On the fourth day of treatment, the dosage of Rytary may be increased to 36.25 mg/145 mg taken three times a day.

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References
Medical Editor: John P. Cunha, DO, FACOEP

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