Streptase vs. Kinlytic

Are Streptase and Kinlytic the Same Thing?

Streptase (streptokinase) and Kinlytic (urokinase) are used to treat blood clots in the lungs (pulmonary embolism).

Streptase is also used to treat heart attack as well as blood clots in the legs (deep venous thrombosis-DVT).

What Are Possible Side Effects of Streptase?

Common side effects of Streptase include:

  • nausea,
  • headache,
  • dizziness,
  • low blood pressure,
  • mild fever,
  • bleeding from wounds or gums,
  • rash,
  • itching,
  • flushing,
  • muscle or bone pain,
  • shivering, and
  • allergic reactions.

Streptase can also cause nerve damage.

What Are Possible Side Effects of Kinlytic?

Common side effects of Kinlytic (urokinase) include:

  • easy bruising or
  • bleeding

Other side effects of Kinlytic are uncommon, but can be severe such as:

See your doctor if you have any side effects.

QUESTION

Deep vein thrombosis (DVT) occurs in the _______________. See Answer

What Is Streptase?

Streptase (streptokinase) is an enzyme used in the treatment of heart attack or lung blood clots (pulmonary embolism) as well as leg blood clots (deep venous thrombosis-DVT). The brand name drug Streptase is no longer available in the U.S. Generic versions may be available.

What Is Kinlytic?

Kinlytic (urokinase) for Injection is a thrombolytic agent used to treat blood clots in the lungs. The brand name Kinlytic is discontinued, but generic versions may be available.

What Drugs Interact With Streptase?

Streptase may interact with blood thinners, non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs), or aspirin. Drugs that can reverse effects of streptokinase include aminocaproic acid, aprotinin, and tranexamic acid. Tell your doctor all medications you are taking.

What Drugs Interact With Kinlytic?

Kinlytic may interact with blood thinners, aspirin or NSAIDs (nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs), or medications used to prevent blood clots. Tell your doctor all medications and supplements you use. Kinlytic is not expected to be harmful to a fetus. However, your doctor should know if you are pregnant before you receive this medication. It is unknown if this drug passes into breast milk or if it could harm a nursing baby. Consult your doctor before breastfeeding
 

How Should Streptase Be Taken?

Streptase (streptokinase) is given by injection by a health care professional. Dose is dependent upon the condition of the patient and response to treatment.

How Should Kinlytic Be Taken?

The loading dose of 4,400 international units per kilogram of Kinlytic injection is given at a rate of 90 mL per hour over a period of 10 minutes. This is followed with a continuous infusion of 4,400 international units per kilogram per hour at a rate of 15 mL for 12 hours.

SLIDESHOW

Spider & Varicose Veins: Causes, Before and After Treatment Images See Slideshow
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References
Medscape. Streptase Drug Information.

https://www.medscape.com/answers/811234-88119/what-is-the-fda-recommended-regimen-of-streptokinase-for-thrombolytic-therapy-of-pulmonary-embolism-pe

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