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Theaflavin

What other names is Theaflavin known by?

Teaflavina, Théaflavin, Théaflavine, Theaflavin-3-gallate, Theaflavin-3'-gallate, Theaflavin-3-3'-digallate, Theaflavins.

What is Theaflavin?

Theaflavin is a chemical in black tea that is formed from fermentation of green tea. It is used as medicine.

People take theaflavin for high cholesterol, heart disease, and cancer.

Insufficient Evidence to Rate Effectiveness for...

  • High cholesterol.
  • Heart disease.
  • Cancer.
  • Other conditions.
More evidence is needed to rate the effectiveness of theaflavin for these uses.

How does Theaflavin work?

Theaflavin has antioxidant, antiviral, and anti-cancer effects in test tube experiments and in animals. The effects of theaflavin in humans are not well studied.

Are there safety concerns?

There is not enough information available to know if taking theaflavin is safe or what the possible side effects might be.

Special Precautions & Warnings:

Pregnancy and breast-feeding: Not enough is known about the use of theaflavin during pregnancy and breast-feeding. Stay on the safe side and avoid use.

Dosing considerations for Theaflavin.

The appropriate dose of theaflavin depends on several factors such as the user's age, health, and several other conditions. At this time there is not enough scientific information to determine an appropriate range of doses for theaflavin. Keep in mind that natural products are not always necessarily safe and dosages can be important. Be sure to follow relevant directions on product labels and consult your pharmacist or physician or other healthcare professional before using.

QUESTION

Next to red peppers, you can get the most vitamin C from ________________. See Answer

Natural Medicines Comprehensive Database rates effectiveness based on scientific evidence according to the following scale: Effective, Likely Effective, Possibly Effective, Possibly Ineffective, Likely Ineffective, and Insufficient Evidence to Rate (detailed description of each of the ratings).

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Reviewed on 9/17/2019
References

Cai F, Li CR, Wu JL, et al. Theaflavin ameliorates cerebral ischemia-reperfusion injury in rats through its anti-inflammatory effect and modulation of STAT-1. Mediators Inflamm 2006;2006:30490. View abstract.

Chen CN, Lin CP, Huang KK, et al. Inhibition of SARS-CoV 3C-like Protease Activity by Theaflavin-3,3'-digallate (TF3). Evid Based Complement Alternat Med 2005;2:209-15. View abstract.

Fukuda I, Sakane I, Yabushita Y, et al. Black tea theaflavins suppress dioxin-induced transformation of the aryl hydrocarbon receptor. Biosci Biotechnol Biochem 2005;69:883-90. View abstract.

Jhoo JW, Lo CY, Li S, et al. Stability of black tea polyphenol, theaflavin, and identification of theanaphthoquinone as its major radical reaction product. Agric Food Chem 2005;53:6146-50. View abstract.

Kundu T, Dey S, Roy M, et al. Induction of apoptosis in human leukemia cells by black tea and its polyphenol theaflavin. Cancer Lett 2005;230:111-21. View abstract.

Liu S, Lu H, Zhao Q, et al. Theaflavin derivatives in black tea and catechin derivatives in green tea inhibit HIV-1 entry by targeting gp41. Biochim Biophys Acta 2005;1723:270-81. View abstract.

Matsui T, Tanaka T, Tamura S, et al. alpha-Glucosidase inhibitory profile of catechins and theaflavins. J Agric Food Chem 2007;55:99-105. View abstract.

Mizuno H, Cho YY, Zhu F, et al. Theaflavin-3, 3'-digallate induces epidermal growth factor receptor downregulation. Mol Carcinog 2006;45:204-12. View abstract.

Tu YY, Tang AB, Watanabe N. The theaflavin monomers inhibit the cancer cells growth in vitro. Acta Biochim Biophys Sin (Shanghai) 2004;36:508-12. View abstract.

Way TD, Lee HH, Kao MC, Lin JK. Black tea polyphenol theaflavins inhibit aromatase activity and attenuate tamoxifen resistance in HER2/neu-transfected human breast cancer cells through tyrosine kinase suppression. Eur J Cancer 2004;40:2165-74. View abstract.

Yanagida A, Shoji A, Shibusawa Y, et al. Analytical separation of tea catechins and food-related polyphenols by high-speed counter-current chromatography. J Chromatogr A 2006;1112:195-201. View abstract.

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