What Are the Early Signs of Cancer?

Reviewed on 4/15/2021

Signs Of Cancer

Cancer, when detected in its early stage, has more chances of being cured than when detected in the advanced stages. Signs and symptoms of cancer vary depending upon the site from where the cancer originated and the extent to which it has advanced or spread. However, some types of cancer may progress to the advanced stages without presenting any symptoms.
Cancer, when detected in its early stage, has more chances of being cured than when detected in the advanced stages. Signs and symptoms of cancer vary depending upon the site from where the cancer originated and the extent to which it has advanced or spread. However, some types of cancer may progress to the advanced stages without presenting any symptoms.

Cancer, when detected in its early stage, has more chances of being cured than when detected in the advanced stages. Signs and symptoms of cancer vary depending upon the site from where the cancer originated and the extent to which it has advanced or spread. However, some types of cancer may progress to the advanced stages without presenting any symptoms. Noticing any one of the symptoms doesn’t mean that you have cancer. However, to be safe, do not ignore these common early signs of cancer.

Changes in bowel and bladder habits:

Warning signs include:

These significant changes may indicate colon, prostate, or bladder cancer.

Bloating:

Bloating is a common symptom we often experience now and then. However, persistent bloating for more than two weeks can be a sign of ovarian cancer and various gastrointestinal cancers.

Chronic coughing:

Persistent cough with or without blood in the sputum for more than two weeks can be a sign of lung cancer.

Chronic headache:

Headache that lasts for more than two weeks and doesn’t respond to any medications may indicate a brain tumor.

Difficulty swallowing:

A feeling of food getting stuck in your throat is a common symptom related to gastric issues. If trouble swallowing persists for more than two weeks, this can be a sign of throat, lung, or stomach cancer.

Frequent fever or infections:

Frequent fever or infections may indicate lymphoma, leukemia, and kidney or liver cancers. Fever that increases or decreases during the day or peaks at the same time may indicate cancer.

Oral changes:

People with oral cancers may exhibit these early signs:

  • Persistent sores
  • Painful areas in the mouth

The risk is higher in people who are addicted to cigarette smoking or alcohol drinking.

Skin changes:

A notable feature of skin cancer is a mole or growth that starts to look different or a sore that doesn’t heal completely. See a dermatologist if you observe these changes:

  • Asymmetrical-looking mole
  • Moles whose edges are asymmetrical or blurred
  • Mole color may be varied or uneven, both black and brown
  • The diameter of a mole is more than the size of a pencil eraser
  • Any mole that grows, bleeds, or otherwise changes over time

Persistent fatigue:

Extreme, persistent fatigue even after getting enough sleep or doing low-level activity may indicate leukemia or lymphoma.

Unexplained weight loss:

If you suddenly start to lose weight without making any efforts, it can indicate advanced-stage cancer. Loss of appetite may indicate stomach, pancreatic, colon, or ovarian cancer.

Stomach pain or nausea:

Any discomfort continuing for more than two weeks may indicate liver, pancreatic, or various digestive system cancer.

Unusual lumps:

Any new lump or mass that doesn’t go away should be evaluated. Lymph nodes often become swollen when you have a cold, but if the swelling continues after you are well, you should contact your doctor.

Night sweats:

In older women, night sweats can be a symptom of menopause; however, it can also be a sign of cancer or an infection.

Some of the early signs of cancer pertaining to men include:

Some of the early signs of cancer pertaining to women include:

These are some of the early signs seen in people with cancer. However, this isn’t indicative of all. Many people may have different symptoms or no symptoms at all. You must consult a physician for the best advice

  • If you fall under any risk category.
  • If you have a family history of cancer.
  • If you experience any vague symptoms.

Moreover, regular screening is recommended in the above people.

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References
https://www.webmd.com/cancer/guide/cancer-early-warning-signs

https://www.ucsfhealth.org/education/17-cancer-symptoms-you-shouldnt-ignore

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