What Is Laparoscopy Used For?

Reviewed on 10/22/2020

What is laparoscopy used for?

Laparoscopy is a minimally invasive technique used to diagnose and treat a variety of conditions.
Laparoscopy is a minimally invasive technique used to diagnose and treat a variety of conditions.

Laparoscopy is a minimally invasive surgery or keyhole surgery that helps diagnose and treat many health conditions. A laparoscope is a thin, flexible tube with a light and small video camera on the end. The tube is put into a small surgical cut made through the abdominal wall near the belly button. A second or third incision may also be made in other parts of the belly to put in other operating instruments. By making the small incision, the surgeon can see images of the required organ on the video monitor and treat the organs without being invasive to the human body. There are a few reasons why laparoscopy may be used

What are the medical conditions that laparoscopy helps diagnose?

Laparoscopies are widely used to diagnose many different conditions

Cancers that can be diagnosed using laparoscopy include

What are the medical conditions that can be treated using laparoscopy?

Laparoscopic surgery may be used to treat different conditions including

What are the benefits and risks of laparoscopy?

Laparoscopy has many benefits which include 

  • Pain after laparoscopic surgery is less.
  • Recovery from laparoscopic surgery is generally faster.
  • Smaller incisions allow the patient’s wounds to heal faster and have smaller scars
  • The risk of infection and complications is lower.

Risks include

  • Laparoscopy may sometimes take longer to perform than open surgery. 
  • Patients may be under anesthesia for a longer time, which may increase the risk of complications. 
  • Sometimes, complications do not appear right away but occur a few days to a few weeks after surgery. 
  • Bleeding or a hernia (a bulge caused by poor healing) at the incision sites
  • Internal bleeding
  • Infection
  • Damage to a blood vessel or other organ, such as the stomach, bowel, bladder or uterus

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References
Medscape Medical Reference

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