Which Is the Best Toothpaste to Use?

Reviewed on 3/24/2021

Toothpaste types

The most important thing you should look for when buying toothpaste is the seal of the American Dental Association (ADA). The best toothpaste depends on the condition of your teeth. Toothpaste are formulated to help fight cavities, sensitivity, weak enamel, stains and other conditions.
The most important thing you should look for when buying toothpaste is the seal of the American Dental Association (ADA). The best toothpaste depends on the condition of your teeth. Toothpaste are formulated to help fight cavities, sensitivity, weak enamel, stains and other conditions.

The most important thing you should look for when buying toothpaste is the seal of the American Dental Association (ADA). After this, the best type of toothpaste for use depends on the condition of your teeth and your dental health.

Fluoride toothpaste

  • If you find yourself getting cavities or your dentist has warned you about possible tooth decay, it may be worth it to look for fluoride-based toothpaste.
  • Fluoride has been tested to help prevent cavities and lower the risk of tooth decay.
  • It helps maintain a fresh and clean feeling while fighting germs for 12 hours.
  • It helps prevent plaque, gingivitis, tartar buildup, cavities and bad breath.

Sensitive teeth

  • For people between the ages of 20 to 50 years old, tooth sensitivity may be an issue.
  • Tooth sensitivity is caused by exposure to the inner part of the tooth called dentin.
  • Look for a toothpaste that treats and is labeled “for sensitive teeth.” It may provide relief from pain caused by sensitive teeth while preventing acid erosion in the future.

Kid-friendly toothpaste

  • When it comes to choosing a toothpaste that is best for your child, it’s important to take into account their age.
  • Before the age of two years old, it’s important to choose fluoride-free toothpaste with a soft-bristle brush for cleansing twice a day.
  • Between the ages of two and four years old, select a toothpaste containing fluoride.
  • Use a toothpaste that is safe for children and is designed to support healthy oral hygiene. Choose a toothpaste that is effective in fighting cavities but gentle on your child’s tooth enamel.

Whiter, brighter teeth

  • Toothpaste can’t dramatically whiten your teeth, but it can help brighten your smile by polishing or dissolving surface stains.
  • It’s important to choose a reputable brand because some whitening products, for example activated charcoal, can be quite abrasive and potentially damage the enamel. Once you’ve found the right toothpaste, brush using a pea-sized dab twice a day. It’s also best not to rinse with mouthwash after brushing.

Dentures

  • Regular toothpaste is too abrasive to be used on dentures.
  • Although you can continue to clean any of your remaining teeth with fluoride toothpaste, dentures need to be cleaned using a non-abrasive denture cleanser.
  • You should never use a whitening toothpaste or product that contains bleach on your dentures because this can weaken your dentures and potentially damage them.
  • If you are unsure how to care for and clean your dentures properly, you should speak to your dentist or dental hygienist. They will teach you how to clean and care for your dentures properly and can suggest a suitable denture cleanser.

Braces

  • Regular toothpaste is fine for people with braces. Select a toothpaste that contains fluoride and make sure to choose a type that also fights tartar buildup.
  • Braces increase the surface area you need to clean to ensure your mouth stays healthy and tartar buildup can become a problem if you don’t keep it under control.
  • People with braces should never use whitening products. The metal or ceramic brackets on your teeth prevent the whitening agent from reaching those areas, which means your teeth will whiten unevenly. When your braces are removed, you will be left with teeth that feature several shades of enamel.
  • If you are unsure how to clean your braces properly, you should speak to your dentist or orthodontist. They will show you how to clean and care for your braces properly and can offer toothpaste suggestions based on your unique needs.

For enamel

  • This toothpaste does what it says on the packaging. It repairs your enamel.
  • Use calcium-based products to boost enamel health and replace the surface of tooth enamel and a repairing toothpaste to restore your teeth.
  • However, the effects of an enamel repair toothpaste won’t last forever because they can only protect the enamel for a little while by offering a thin layer of protection.

When choosing toothpaste, you should consider the level of tartar control each brand and type offers. Tartar is formed when plaque, a transparent sticky substance made by bacteria, is allowed to sit on teeth. A tartar-control toothpaste, which contains chemicals such as zinc citrate and pyrophosphates, can help prevent tartar buildup. Once plaque has hardened into tartar, it can only be removed by your dentist or dental hygienist using specialized tools.

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References
Medscape Medical Reference

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