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Xodol

Last reviewed on RxList: 11/9/2018
Xodol Side Effects Center

Medical Editor: John P. Cunha, DO, FACOEP

Last reviewed on RxList 11/9/2018

Xodol (hydrocodone bitartrate and acetaminophen tablet) is a combination of an opioid pain reliever and an analgesic/fever reducer used to manage pain severe enough to require an opioid analgesic and for which alternative treatments are inadequate. Common side effects of Xodol include:

  • lightheadedness,
  • dizziness,
  • drowsiness,
  • nausea,
  • vomiting,
  • sedation,
  • mental clouding,
  • lethargy,
  • impaired mental and physical performance,
  • anxiety,
  • fear,
  • uneasiness,
  • psychological dependence,
  • mood changes,
  • constipation,
  • urinary retention,
  • skin rash, and
  • itching

The usual adult dosage of Xodol is one or two 5 mg tablets, one 7.5 mg tablet, or one 10 mg tablet, every four to six hours as needed for pain. Xodol may interact with other drugs that can make you sleepy or slow your breathing (benzodiazepines, sedatives/hypnotics, anti-anxiety medications, tranquilizers, muscle relaxants, general anesthetics, antipsychotics, other opioids, alcohol), macrolide antibiotics, azole antifungals, protease inhibitors, rifampin, carbamazepine, phenytoin, selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs), serotonin and norepinephrine reuptake inhibitors (SNRIs), tricyclic antidepressants (TCAs), triptans, 5-HT3 receptor antagonists, drugs that affect the serotonin neurotransmitter system (e.g., mirtazapine, trazodone, tramadol), monoamine oxidase inhibitors (MAOIs), diuretics, and anticholinergics. Tell your doctor all medications and supplements you use. Tell your doctor if you are pregnant or plan to become pregnant before using Xodol; it may harm a fetus. Prolonged use of Xodol during pregnancy can result in withdrawal symptoms in the newborn. Use of Xodol while breastfeeding may cause increased sleepiness (more than usual), breathing difficulties, or limpness in a nursing infant. Consult your doctor before breastfeeding. Withdrawal symptoms may occur if you suddenly stop taking Xodol.

Our Xodol (hydrocodone bitartrate and acetaminophen tablet) Side Effects Drug Center provides a comprehensive view of available drug information on the potential side effects when taking this medication.

This is not a complete list of side effects and others may occur. Call your doctor for medical advice about side effects. You may report side effects to FDA at 1-800-FDA-1088.

QUESTION

Medically speaking, the term "myalgia" refers to what type of pain? See Answer
Xodol Professional Information

SIDE EFFECTS

The following adverse reactions have been identified during post approval use of hydrocodone and acetaminophen tablets. Because these reactions are reported voluntarily from a population of uncertain size, it is not always possible to reliably estimate their frequency or establish a causal relationship to drug exposure.

The most frequently reported adverse reactions are light-headedness, dizziness, sedation, nausea and vomiting.

Other Adverse Reactions Include

Central Nervous System

Drowsiness, mental clouding, lethargy, impairment of mental and physical performance, anxiety, fear, dysphoria, psychological dependence, mood changes.

Gastrointestinal System

Constipation.

Genitourinary System

Ureteral spasm, spasm of vesical sphincters, and urinary retention.

Special Senses

Cases of hearing impairment or permanent loss have been reported predominately in patients with chronic overdose.

Dermatological

Skin rash, pruritus, Stevens-Johnson syndrome, toxic epidermal necrolysis, allergic reactions.

Hematological

Thrombocytopenia, agranulocytosis.

  • Serotonin syndrome: Cases of serotonin syndrome, a potentially life-threatening condition, have been reported during concomitant use of opioids with serotonergic drugs.
  • Adrenal insufficiency: Cases of adrenal insufficiency have been reported with opioid use, more often following greater than one month of use.
  • Anaphylaxis: Anaphylaxis has been reported with ingredients contained in hydrocodone bitartrate and acetaminophen tablets.

Androgen deficiency: Cases of androgen deficiency have occurred with chronic use of opioids [see CLINICAL PHARMACOLOGY].

Drug Abuse And Dependence

Controlled Substance

Hydrocodone bitartrate and acetaminophen tablets contain hydrocodone, a Schedule II controlled substance.

Abuse

Hydrocodone bitartrate and acetaminophen tablets contain hydrocodone, a substance with a high potential for abuse similar to other opioids, including fentanyl, hydromorphone, methadone, morphine, oxycodone, oxymorphone, and tapentadol, can be abused and are subject to misuse, addiction, and criminal diversion [see WARNINGS].

All patients treated with opioids require careful monitoring for signs of abuse and addiction, because use of opioid analgesic products carries the risk of addiction even under appropriate medical use.

Prescription drug abuse is the intentional non-therapeutic use of a prescription drug, even once, for its rewarding psychological or physiological effects.

Drug addiction is a cluster of behavioral, cognitive, and physiological phenomena that develop after repeated substance use and includes a strong desire to take the drug, difficulties in controlling its use, persisting in its use despite harmful consequences, a higher priority given to drug use than to other activities and obligations, increased tolerance, and sometimes a physical withdrawal.

“Drug-seeking” behavior is very common in persons with substance use disorders. Drug-seeking tactics include emergency calls or visits near the end of office hours, refusal to undergo appropriate examination, testing, or referral, repeated “loss” of prescriptions, tampering with prescriptions and reluctance to provide prior medical records or contact information for other treating healthcare provider(s). “Doctor shopping” (visiting multiple prescribers to obtain additional prescriptions) is common among drug abusers and people suffering from untreated addiction. Preoccupation with achieving adequate pain relief can be appropriate behavior in a patient with poor pain control.

Abuse and addiction are separate and distinct from physical dependence and tolerance. Health care providers should be aware that addiction may not be accompanied by concurrent tolerance and symptoms of physical dependence in all addicts. In addition, abuse of opioids can occur in the absence of true addiction.

Hydrocodone bitartrate and acetaminophen tablets, like other opioids, can be diverted for non-medical use into illicit channels of distribution. Careful record-keeping of prescribing information, including quantity, frequency, and renewal requests, as required by state and federal law, is strongly advised.

Proper assessment of the patient, proper prescribing practices, periodic re-evaluation of therapy, and proper dispensing and storage are appropriate measures that help to limit abuse of opioid drugs.

Risks Specific To Abuse Of Hydrocodone Bitartrate And Acetaminophen Tablets

Hydrocodone bitartrate and acetaminophen tablets are for oral use only. Hydrocodone bitartrate and acetaminophen tablets pose a risk of overdose and death. The risk is increased with concurrent abuse of hydrocodone bitartrate and acetaminophen tablets with alcohol and other central nervous system depressants.

Parenteral drug abuse is commonly associated with transmission of infectious diseases such as hepatitis and HIV.

Dependence

Both tolerance and physical dependence can develop during chronic opioid therapy. Tolerance is the need for increasing doses of opioids to maintain a defined effect such as analgesia (in the absence of disease progression or other external factors). Tolerance may occur to both the desired and undesired effects of drugs, and may develop at different rates for different effects.

Physical dependence results in withdrawal symptoms after abrupt discontinuation or a significant dosage reduction of a drug. Withdrawal also may be precipitated through the administration of drugs with opioid antagonist activity (e.g., naloxone, nalmefene), mixed agonist/antagonist analgesics (e.g., pentazocine, butorphanol, nalbuphine), or partial agonists (e.g., buprenorphine). Physical dependence may not occur to a clinically significant degree until after several days to weeks of continued opioid usage.

Hydrocodone bitartrate and acetaminophen tablets should not be abruptly discontinued in a physically dependent patient [see DOSAGE AND ADMINISTRATION]. If hydrocodone bitartrate and acetaminophen tablets are abruptly discontinued in a physically dependent patient, a withdrawal syndrome may occur. Some or all of the following can characterize this syndrome: restlessness, lacrimation, rhinorrhea, yawning, perspiration, chills, myalgia, and mydriasis. Other signs and symptoms also may develop, including: irritability, anxiety, backache, joint pain, weakness, abdominal cramps, insomnia, nausea, anorexia, vomiting, diarrhea, or increased blood pressure, respiratory rate, or heart rate.

Infants born to mothers physically dependent on opioids will also be physically dependent and may exhibit respiratory difficulties and withdrawal signs [see PRECAUTIONS; Pregnancy].

Read the entire FDA prescribing information for Xodol (Hydrocodone Bitartrate and Acetaminophen Tablets)

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© Xodol Patient Information is supplied by Cerner Multum, Inc. and Xodol Consumer information is supplied by First Databank, Inc., used under license and subject to their respective copyrights.

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