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Zithromax vs. Levaquin

Are Levaquin and Zithromax the Same Thing?

Zithromax Z-PAK (azithromycin) and Levaquin (levofloxacin) are antibiotics used to treat bacterial infections.

Zithromax and Levaquin belong to different antibiotic drug classes. Zithromax is a macrolide antibiotic and Levaquin is a fluoroquinolone antibiotic.

What Are Possible Side Effects of Zithromax?

Common side effects of Zithromax include:

What Are Possible Side Effects of Levaquin?

Common side effects of Levaquin include:

  • nausea,
  • vomiting,
  • diarrhea,
  • headache,
  • constipation,
  • difficulty sleeping (insomnia),
  • dizziness,
  • abdominal pain,
  • rash,
  • abdominal gas,
  • itching, and
  • vaginal itching or discharge.

Levaquin has been associated with tendinitis and tendon rupture. Levaquin can alter the normal bacteria in the colon and cause pseudomembranous colitis. Patients taking Levaquin can develop photosensitivity (sensitivity to sunlight) and patients may sunburn more easily.

What is Zithromax?

Zithromax Z-PAK (azithromycin) is a semi-synthetic macrolide antibiotic used for treating:

Zithromax is also effective against several sexually transmitted infectious diseases (STDs) such as nongonococcal urethritis and cervicitis. Zithromax is available in generic form.

What is Levaquin?

Levaquin is a fluoroquinolone antibiotic medicine used in adults age 18 years or older to treat certain infections caused by certain germs called bacteria. These bacterial infections include:

What Drugs Interact With Zithromax?

Zithromax may interact with blood thinners, cyclosporine, other antibiotics, theophylline, cholesterol-lowering medicines, heart medications, HIV medicines, sedatives or seizure medicines.

Zithromax may also interact with arsenic trioxide, pimozide, tacrolimus, antidepressants, anti-malaria medications, ergot medicines, blood pressure medications, medicine to prevent or treat nausea and vomiting, medicines to treat psychiatric disorders, migraine headache medicines, narcotics, or tranquilizers.

What Drugs Interact With Levaquin?

Levaquin may interact with blood thinners, antibiotics, antidepressants, anti-malaria medications, medicine to prevent or treat nausea and vomiting, medicines to treat psychiatric disorders, migraine headache medicines, nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs), steroids, or narcotics.

Levaquin may also interact with antacids that contain magnesium or aluminum, sucralfate, didanosine, vitamin or mineral supplements that contain iron or zinc, insulin or oral diabetes medications, or theophylline.

How Should Zithromax Be Taken?

A typical oral dose of Zithromax consists of 500 mg for 1 day then 250 mg for 4 days. A typical intravenous dose consists of 500 mg for 2 days followed by 500 mg orally daily for an additional 5-8 days.

How Should Levaquin Be Taken?

  • Take Levaquin exactly as your healthcare provider tells you to take it.
  • Take Levaquin at about the same time each day.
  • Drink plenty of fluids while you take Levaquin.
  • Take Levaquin Oral Solution 1 hour before or 2 hours after eating.
  • If you miss a dose of Levaquin, take it as soon as you remember. Do not take more than 1 dose in 1 day.
  • Do not skip any doses of Levaquin or stop taking it, even if you begin to feel better, until you finish your prescribed treatment unless:
    • you have tendon problems. See “What is the most important information I should know about Levaquin?”.
    • you have a serious allergic reaction. See “What are the possible side effects of Levaquin?”.
    • your healthcare provider tells you to stop taking Levaquin
      Taking all of your Levaquin doses will help make sure that all of the bacteria are killed. Taking all of your Levaquin doses will help you lower the chance that the bacteria will become resistant to Levaquin. If your infection does not get better while you take Levaquin, it may mean that the bacteria causing your infection may be resistant to Levaquin. If your infection does not get better, call your healthcare provider. If your infection does not get better, Levaquin and other similar antibiotic medicines may not work for you in the future.
  • If you take too much Levaquin, call your healthcare provider or get medical help right away.

Are Levaquin and Zithromax the Same Thing?

Zithromax Z-PAK (azithromycin) and Levaquin (levofloxacin) are antibiotics used to treat bacterial infections.

Zithromax and Levaquin belong to different antibiotic drug classes. Zithromax is a macrolide antibiotic and Levaquin is a fluoroquinolone antibiotic.

What Are Possible Side Effects of Zithromax?

Common side effects of Zithromax include:

What Are Possible Side Effects of Levaquin?

Common side effects of Levaquin include:

  • nausea,
  • vomiting,
  • diarrhea,
  • headache,
  • constipation,
  • difficulty sleeping (insomnia),
  • dizziness,
  • abdominal pain,
  • rash,
  • abdominal gas,
  • itching, and
  • vaginal itching or discharge.

Levaquin has been associated with tendinitis and tendon rupture. Levaquin can alter the normal bacteria in the colon and cause pseudomembranous colitis. Patients taking Levaquin can develop photosensitivity (sensitivity to sunlight) and patients may sunburn more easily.

What is Zithromax?

Zithromax Z-PAK (azithromycin) is a semi-synthetic macrolide antibiotic used for treating:

Zithromax is also effective against several sexually transmitted infectious diseases (STDs) such as nongonococcal urethritis and cervicitis. Zithromax is available in generic form.

What is Levaquin?

Levaquin is a fluoroquinolone antibiotic medicine used in adults age 18 years or older to treat certain infections caused by certain germs called bacteria. These bacterial infections include:

What Drugs Interact With Zithromax?

Zithromax may interact with blood thinners, cyclosporine, other antibiotics, theophylline, cholesterol-lowering medicines, heart medications, HIV medicines, sedatives or seizure medicines.

Zithromax may also interact with arsenic trioxide, pimozide, tacrolimus, antidepressants, anti-malaria medications, ergot medicines, blood pressure medications, medicine to prevent or treat nausea and vomiting, medicines to treat psychiatric disorders, migraine headache medicines, narcotics, or tranquilizers.

What Drugs Interact With Levaquin?

Levaquin may interact with blood thinners, antibiotics, antidepressants, anti-malaria medications, medicine to prevent or treat nausea and vomiting, medicines to treat psychiatric disorders, migraine headache medicines, nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs), steroids, or narcotics.

Levaquin may also interact with antacids that contain magnesium or aluminum, sucralfate, didanosine, vitamin or mineral supplements that contain iron or zinc, insulin or oral diabetes medications, or theophylline.

How Should Zithromax Be Taken?

A typical oral dose of Zithromax consists of 500 mg for 1 day then 250 mg for 4 days. A typical intravenous dose consists of 500 mg for 2 days followed by 500 mg orally daily for an additional 5-8 days.

How Should Levaquin Be Taken?

  • Take Levaquin exactly as your healthcare provider tells you to take it.
  • Take Levaquin at about the same time each day.
  • Drink plenty of fluids while you take Levaquin.
  • Take Levaquin Oral Solution 1 hour before or 2 hours after eating.
  • If you miss a dose of Levaquin, take it as soon as you remember. Do not take more than 1 dose in 1 day.
  • Do not skip any doses of Levaquin or stop taking it, even if you begin to feel better, until you finish your prescribed treatment unless:
    • you have tendon problems. See “What is the most important information I should know about Levaquin?”.
    • you have a serious allergic reaction. See “What are the possible side effects of Levaquin?”.
    • your healthcare provider tells you to stop taking Levaquin
      Taking all of your Levaquin doses will help make sure that all of the bacteria are killed. Taking all of your Levaquin doses will help you lower the chance that the bacteria will become resistant to Levaquin. If your infection does not get better while you take Levaquin, it may mean that the bacteria causing your infection may be resistant to Levaquin. If your infection does not get better, call your healthcare provider. If your infection does not get better, Levaquin and other similar antibiotic medicines may not work for you in the future.
  • If you take too much Levaquin, call your healthcare provider or get medical help right away.
Reviewed on 5/15/2018

RxList. Zithromax Medication Guide.

http://labeling.pfizer.com/ShowLabeling.aspx?id=511

DailyMed. Levaquin Product Monograph.

https://dailymed.nlm.nih.gov/dailymed/drugInfo.cfm?setid=a1f01e8e-97e9-11de-b91d-553856d89593

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