Zofran vs. Bonjesta

Reviewed on 10/30/2019

Are Zofran and Bonjesta the Same Thing?

Zofran (ondansetron) and Bonjesta (doxylamine succinate and pyridoxine hydrochloride) are used to treat nausea and vomiting due to different causes.

Zofran is used to treat nausea and vomiting due to cancer chemotherapy and to prevent and treat nausea and vomiting after surgery.

Bonjesta is used to treat nausea and vomiting of pregnancy in women who do not respond to conservative management.

Zofran and Bonjesta belong to different drug classes. Zofran is an antiemetic (anti-nausea and vomiting) and selective 5-HT3 receptor antagonist and Bonjesta is a combination of an antihistamine and a Vitamin B6 analog.

Side effects of Zofran and Bonjesta that are similar include drowsiness.

Side effects of Zofran that are different from Bonjesta include diarrhea, headache, fever, lightheadedness, dizziness, weakness, tiredness, constipation, rash, blurred vision, and muscle spasm.

Side effects of Bonjesta that are different from Zofran include falls.

Zofran may interact with arsenic trioxide, tacrolimus, tramadol, antibiotics, antidepressants, anti-malaria medications, heart rhythm medicines, medicine to prevent or treat nausea and vomiting, medicines to treat psychiatric disorders, migraine headache medicines, narcotics, and seizure medications.

Bonjesta may interact with alcohol, other medicines that can make you sleepy (sedatives, tranquilizers), and monoamine oxidase inhibitors (MAOIs).

What Are Possible Side Effects of Zofran?

Common side effects of Zofran include:

  • diarrhea,
  • headache,
  • fever,
  • lightheadedness,
  • dizziness,
  • weakness,
  • tiredness,
  • drowsiness,
  • constipation,
  • rash,
  • blurred vision, and
  • muscle spasm.

What Are Possible Side Effects of Bonjesta?

Common side effects of Bonjesta include:

  • drowsiness

What Is Zofran?

Zofran (ondansetron) is an antiemetic and selective 5-HT3 receptor antagonist prescribed for the treatment of nausea and vomiting due to cancer chemotherapy and also used to prevent and treat nausea and vomiting after surgery. Zofran is available in generic form.

What Is Bonjesta?

Bonjesta (doxylamine succinate and pyridoxine hydrochloride) is a fixed dose combination of an antihistamine and a Vitamin B6 analog, indicated for the treatment of nausea and vomiting of pregnancy in women who do not respond to conservative management.

SLIDESHOW

13 Early Signs & Symptoms of Pregnancy See Slideshow

What Drugs Interact With Zofran?

Zofran may interact with medicines to treat psychiatric disorders, narcotics, or seizure medications. Zofran may also interact with arsenic trioxide, tacrolimus, tramadol, antibiotics, antidepressants, anti-malaria medications, heart rhythm medicines, other medicines to prevent or treat nausea and vomiting, and migraine headache medicines.

What Drugs Interact With Bonjesta?

Bonjesta may interact with alcohol, other medicines that can make you sleepy (sedatives, tranquilizers), and monoamine oxidase inhibitors (MAOIs). Tell your doctor all medications and supplements you use. Bonjesta is intended for use during pregnancy. Breastfeeding while using Bonjesta is not recommended.

How Should Zofran Be Taken?

Zofran adult dose is 32-mg given as a single dose or divided in three 0.15-mg/kg divided doses infused over 15 minutes.

How Should Bonjesta Be Taken?

The dose of Bonjesta is one tablet at bedtime on Day 1. On Day 2, if symptoms are not adequately controlled, the dose of Bonjesta can be increased to one tablet in the morning and one tablet at bedtime. The maximum recommended dose of Bonjesta is two tablets daily, one in the morning and one at bedtime.

QUESTION

The first sign of pregnancy is most often: See Answer
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References
Dailymed. Zofran Product Monograph.

https://dailymed.nlm.nih.gov/dailymed/drugInfo.cfm?setid=c7d61d98-fe86-4340-9b86-47eb92acaa0e

Duchesnay USA Inc. Bonjesta Product Information.

https://www.bonjesta.com

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